Weekly Links: Sean Monahan and the NHL-CHL relationship; Steve Moore lawsuit to go to trial; Ethical sourcing of hockey gear; New books by Ken Dryden and Dave Bidini; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Ken Campbell has an interesting read, in light of the Calgary Flames’ decision to keep 2013 first round pick Sean Monahan in the NHL, about the agreement between the NHL and the Canadian Hockey League that forces players to return to junior (rather than the AHL) if they do not stick with their NHL team. [The Hockey News]
  • Steve Moore’s lawsuit against Todd Bertuzzi, ten years after the latter’s attack on the former, will finally be heard in front of a jury in September of next year. [CBC Sports]
  • Hockey Canada is working to ensure that all of their products are manufactured by ethical suppliers. This is perhaps in response to the revelation that factory workers who were killed in the 2013 Bangladesh building collapse were making products for Loblaws. [Globe and Mail]

  • An interesting Q&A with Bobby Orr, who speaks about abusive hockey parents and his relationship with Alan Eagleson. [Maclean's]
  • Scott Lewis has a review of ESPN’s latest 30 for 30 documentary, which examines the John Spano saga. Spano was a fraudulent businessman who purchased the New York Islanders before it was revealed that he had forged documents and lied about his net worth – Spano, eventually, was sent to prison. [Backhand Shelf]
  • Ken Dryden has published a 30th anniversary edition of his classic hockey book The Game, and Grantland has published an excerpt from the book’s new material. [Grantland]
  • Joe Pack reviews Dave Bidini’s new book Keon and Me, which focuses heavily on the author’s fandom of the Toronto Maple Leafs and their star player Dave Keon. [The Hockey Writers]
  • An excellent summary of which NHL teams are employing hockey analytics as part of their team strategy and to what degree. [SB Nation]
  • And if you’re looking to better understand hockey analytics and why it continues to grow, including some of the misconceptions, definitely check out this piece over at Arctic Ice Hockey. [Arctic Ice Hockey]
  • There have been a number of dangerous hits thus far in the 2013-14 NHL season, and consequently a high number of suspensions. This post has some insight into how Brendan Shanahan and the Department of Player Safety make their decisions about suspension length and the potential impact of the NHLPA’s right to challenge bans. [Puck Daddy]
  • An overview of the Florida Panthers’ 20 year history and the challenges of selling NHL hockey in Southern Florida. [Fox Sports Florida]
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About markdavidnorman
Mark is a PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto, where he researches sociocultural issues in sport and physical cultures. He is also a life-long hockey fan, becoming obsessed with the sport at a young age and cheering for the Vancouver Canucks for over two (mostly futile) decades. In addition to his work at Hockey in Society, Mark has been active as a fan hockey blogger for over three years. Mark has worked as a Research Assistant at York University (Toronto, ON) and the Centre for Sport Policy Studies at the University of Toronto. He has presented his research at numerous academic conferences and been published in the Sociology of Sport Journal and Journal of Sport and Social Issues.

2 Responses to Weekly Links: Sean Monahan and the NHL-CHL relationship; Steve Moore lawsuit to go to trial; Ethical sourcing of hockey gear; New books by Ken Dryden and Dave Bidini; and more

  1. Joe Pack says:

    Mark,
    I didn’t see this until today but thank you for including my article from The Hockey Writers on Dave Bidini’s book, “Keon and Me”. I do read the Hockey In Society blog weekly and was proud of the article and that it found its way here.
    Cheers,
    Joe

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