Weekly Links: CWHL All-Star Game reaction; KHL impacted by falling Russian Ruble; NHL’s mumps outbreak; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • If you missed Alvin Ma’s post on the CWHL All-Star Game at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto, you can check it out here. [Hockey in Society]
  • Reina de la Isla and Zoë Hayden have both been doing great reporting on the CWHL this year. Here are their takes on the All-Star Game. [Hockey Wilderness; Stanley Cup of Chowder]
  • The plunging ruble is destabilizing the Russian economy and drastically affecting the Kontinental Hockey League. This is an interesting story worth following in the coming months. Here is some initial analysis from Dmitry Chesnokov and James Mirtle. [Puck Daddy; Globe and Mail]
  • How has the NHL been hit by an outbreak of mumps, a relatively rare disease? Matt McCarthy explores this outbreak, which has affected more than 13 players and two officials, including Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby. [Deadspin]

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Weekly Links: Rumoured NHL expansion to Las Vegas; The impact of the NHL salary cap; New arena for Ottawa Senators?; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The NHL continues its slow waltz toward expanding to Las Vegas. Nick Costonika reports the latest from the NHL Board of Governors meeting. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • A critique of the NHL’s chances to succeed in Las Vegas.  [Canucks Army]
  • The Ottawa Senators are exploring building a new downtown arena, which would see them move from the suburb of Kanata to the city centre.  [Sportsnet]
  • A long-form article on the Montreal Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban, and his polarizing reputation around the NHL.   [The New Yorker]
  • Lyle Richardson gives a good myth-busting overview of some of the impacts of the NHL salary cap. [Spector’s Hockey]

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Weekly Links: Remembering Pat Quinn and Viktor Tikhanov; Prince Albert Raiders drop controversial mascot; Impact of Arizona State in men’s NCAA hockey; and more

  • Two legendary hockey coaches passed away this week: Viktor Tikhanov, who coached the USSR through many successful decades in international hockey; and Pat Quinn, who coached Canada’s Gold Medal winning 2002 Olympic Men’s team and (in various stings between 1979 and 2010) the Philadelphia Flyers, Los Angeles Kings, Vancouver Canucks, Toronto Maple Leafs, and Edmonton Oilers. Elliotte Friedman reflects on the life and legacy of both men. [Sportsnet]
  • Two further reflections on Tikhanov’s legacy, from Stephen Smith and Dmitry Chesnekov. [puckstruck; Puck Daddy]
  • Roch Carrier’s classic Canadian tale, The Hockey Sweater, is celebrating its 30th anniversary. [CBC News]
  • Many college hockey pundits and fans are celebrating Arizona State’s entry into NCAA men’s hockey competition. Jeff Cox offers a dissenting opinion, considering how this could damage the sport at the college level. [SBN College Hockey]
  • After the WHL’s Prince Albert Raiders stirred controversy with a mascot that presented a cartoonish caricature of an Arab man, the team decided to pull the mascot. [Huffington Post]
  • Quebec used to produce a large number of NHL-calibre goalies, but no longer. Ken Campbell considers why. [The Hockey News]
  • With an NHL-controlled World Cup of Hockey likely to launch soon, the league is hoping the tournament will generate $100 million in revenue. [Puck Daddy]

Weekly Links: Voynov charged for domestic violence; Confronting racism in hockey; Ex-owner criticizes CHL’s treatment of junior players; Why the CHWL is great; and more

  • After an ongoing police investigation, the LA Kings’ Slava Voynov is being charged for violence against his spouse. [The Score]
  • Really interesting article by Rick Westhead about the treatment of CHL junior players after they leave hockey, as ex-owner Mario Forgione states that “players are a disposable commodity.” [TSN]
  • The new mascot for the WHL’s Prince Albert Raiders, which depicts a cartoonish Arab man, is drawing criticism. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Hockey players from racial or ethnic minorities are increasingly speaking out about the racist abuse that they face in the sport. A really important story to read. [CBC News]
  • Zoë Hayden has a great post on the CWHL’s appeal in contrast to the NHL. [Stanley Cup of Chowder]

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Hockey Research at the 2014 North American Society for the Sociology of Sport (NASSS) Conference

One of the things we like to do at Hockey in Society is highlight current sociocultural research about hockey being done by scholars across the globe (you can see various posts related to academic conferences here). Last week, the annual conference for the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport (NASSS), a scholarly association for sport sociologists, took place in Portland, Oregon. Unfortunately I was not able to attend, but the program is published online, so I am still able to highlight the research being presented that it relevant to the critical study of hockey and its place in society.

After the jump, check out the abstracts from relevant presentations (including from Hockey in Society writers Courtney Szto and Matt Ventresca). Topics include entrepreneurship and the formation of all-Black sport leagues (including the Colored Hockey League in the Canadian Maritimes) in the Reconstruction Era; racialized media media representations of black players, including the Montreal Canadiens’ P.K. Subban; the demise of Hockey Night in Canada and La soirée du hockey and the loss of hockey on Canada’s pubic broadcasters; social media reaction to Punjabi hockey broadcasts; and concussions in sport.

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Weely Links: OHL players suspenced for social media misogyny; Nostalgia and the New York Islanders move to Brooklyn; An interview with Hilary Knight; Toronto Maple Leafs to play in China?; and more

  • Two OHL players, Greg Betzold and Jake Marchment, were suspended for 15 games each after their Tindr conversations with two women, which included a lot of abusive and misogynistic language, were made public. Sunaya Sapurji has a great article on the incident in light of the prevailing cultural attitudes in junior hockey. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Neate Sager’s piece on the incident is also worth reading. [Buzzing the Net]
  • Executives from the Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment group are exploring business opportunities in China. There’s also interest in China to host an NHL game there as soon as next season. [TSN]
  • An interview with women’s hockey superstar Hilary Knight. [The Pink Puck]
  • A really interesting look at issues of nostalgia and sense of place concerning the Islanders move from the Nassau Coliseum on Long Island to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. [Thought Catalog]
  • Ashley March weighs in on mental illness in hockey, particularly for those countless forgotten players whose careers do not result in well-paid, secure NHL employment. [Canucks Army]

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Weekly Links: Reaction to Voynov’s arrest for domestic violence; Ex-players’ lawsuit against the Canadian Hockey League; Szabados and Raty play in men’s pro leagues; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • After a gunman killed a Canadian reservist and attempted an attack on Parliament in Ottawa, the Pittsburgh Penguins played the Canadian anthem before their game against the Philadelphia Flyers as a show of respect. [Sportsnet]
  • The news that Slava Voynov of the Los Angeles Kings had been arrested for domestic violence has generated a huge amount of discussion and debate (currently charges are likely or will be dropped, depending on whether you listen to the DA or to his Voynov’s lawyer). Adam Proteau argues that the NHL should adopt a zero tolerance policy for domestic violence and ban players found guilty of this crime for life. [The Hockey News]
  • Meanwhile, writer stace_ofbase from Battle of California uses the Voynov case to discuss domestic violence more broadly and call for empathy for victims. [Battle of California]
  • NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman is receiving kudos, and favourable comparisons to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s handling of Ray Rice’s violent assault, for handling this situation swiftly and suspending Voynov indefinitely until a verdict is reached. I find it sad that this response even needs to be applauded rather than taken as granted, but given the pro sport world’s track record on domestic violence perhaps we need to start by pointing out when a league acts sensibly in response to a new incident. [Puck Daddy; Globe and Mail]
  • For those wondering about the moral quandary of cheering for athletes who do bad things off the ice/court/field, this scholarly roundtable discussion (written in light of the Ray Rice case) is fascinating reading. [The Allrounder]

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