Weekly Links: Taxes paid by NHL players; Attendance issues in Florida; History of Nassau Coliseum; Growth of women’s hockey in Mexico; and more

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Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A look into the different taxes NHL players pay depending on their province or state. Montreal is listed as the worst for players, while Florida and Nashville have lower tax rates. [TSN]
  • A recent NHL game in Florida was poorly attended, drawing criticism from fans who feel the market cannot sustain a professional hockey club. But other factors other than the market are impacting the poor attendance, including the team’s performance. [SB Nation]
  • An excellent profile of Nassau Coliseum, which the New York Islanders will be vacating to move to Brooklyn. [The Cauldron]

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Hockey Scouting in the Modern Age: An Interview with Victor Carneiro of the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds

hockeyscoutingWith the development of communication technology such as the web, social media and mobile technology, information pertaining to hockey has increased both in size and importance. The NHL, their broadcasters and media outlets are producing an astounding amount of content delivered on an array of platforms. Fans continue to demand information, and have played a key role in the development of new hockey related content. And of course, hockey teams are also acquiring as much information as they can for managerial decisions and to improve on-ice performance.

Not only has the amount of and demand for information increased, but many more channels between all stakeholders to share and develop information have opened as well. Teams however, are understandably restricted as to how much they can publicly disclose, mindful of the competitive nature of their business. Scouting in particular, which is relied upon to draft and acquire players has evolved in the modern age as communication technology increases in significance.

To get a better perspective on scouting in the modern age, I reached out to Victor Carneiro, Director of Player Personnel for the OHL’s Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds. Victor is also active online, at times giving a glimpse into the world of scouting in  junior hockey.

Tell us about yourself, how you got into hockey, and how you landed with the Soo.

Well, I’m from Toronto. I’m a big sports fan. I like a lot of sports outside of hockey, soccer probably being number two. I find a lot of the flow sports have some similarities with hockey as well. 

As for getting into hockey, growing up, like most Canadian kids, I was a big hockey fan. But I realized at a young age I wasn’t going to make it as a pro hockey player. Luckily the school I went to had a hockey arena on campus and I just ended up being a rink rat. I mainly did the scorekeeping and timekeeping for our school’s games but I also helped with the ice and at times in the snack bar. I remember being asked to do the scorekeeping and timekeeping for a high school tournament and I ended up getting paid. I thought it was so great to watch hockey and get paid.

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Weekly Links: Lack of female analysts in NHL broadcasts; Player contracts impacted by sanctions on Russia; International Champions League; ECHL-CHL merger finalized; and more

Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City, Missouri

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Katie Flynn of The Score looks into the changes to the Sportsnet hockey broadcast team, and the lack of female analysts. [Pension Plan Puppets]
  • The economic sanctions placed on Russia by the US, Canada and Europe following their annexation of Crimea may have an impact on future player contracts. The NHLPA is advising player agents that contracts signed with KHL clubs may violate the current sanctions, possibly resulting in financial or criminal punishments. [TSN]

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Weekly Links: Passing of Seth Martin; World Cup of Hockey plans; WHL teams being investigated by US Labour Department; Recap of Alberta Hockey Analytics Conference ; and more

Seth Marting (Source: The Province)

Seth Martin (Source: The Province)

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Sad to announce the passing of international hockey legend Seth Martin. The popular Trail Smoke Eater played for Canada in the 1964 Olympics where he was named the top goalie of the tournament. He also represented his country in several World Championships, having a profound impact on a number of international goalies including Russian legend Vladislav Tretiak. [The Hockey News] [Bradford's Academy]
  • The NHL and NHLPA continue to plan for a World Cup of Hockey event in September 2016. The NHL has yet to decide if they will participate in the next Olympics, which will have a direct impact on whether or not a World Cup will be held. [ESPN]
  • The NHL recently explored the option of adding advertisements to player jerseys. Each team could potentially gain an additional $4 million per season with ads, but the league has thus far rejected the idea. [TSN]
  • The state of Washington, home to four WHL clubs, is investigating the CHL after receiving a complaint pertaining to the salaries for junior players and working conditions. [Buzzing the Net]

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Weekly Links: Lawsuit between Moore and Bertuzzi settled; Profile of Hobey Baker; Tension between traditional media and bloggers; Jamaican hockey; and more

Legendary broadcaster Foster Hewitt

Legendary broadcaster Foster Hewitt

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The lawsuit filed by Steve Moore, whose career was ended by Todd Bertuzzi, has been settled. Details of the settlement, however, will remain confidential. [Pro Hockey Talk]
  • An excellent piece on the life and times of Hobey Baker, a college standout in athletics. The annual Hobey Baker award is given to the top hockey player in NCAA. [Sports Illustrated]
  • A look back at the 1994 NHL lockout, including the events leading up to work stoppage and the key players involved. [Down Goes Brown]

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Weekly Links: Moore-Bertuzzi case yet to be settled; New York Islanders sold; Canucks holding hockey camps in China; Ideas for an international champions league, and more

Source: New York Islanders

Source: New York Islanders

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The lawsuit filed by former NHL player Steve Moore against Todd Bertuzzi stemming from an on-ice incident has yet to be settled. The case was reported to be closed this week, but there are conflicting messages from both parties. [TSN]
  • It’s hard to believe that the Moore-Bertuzzi incident happened ten years ago. One fan re-lives the game and reflects on the build-up leading up to the attack, the “code” and the ensuing fallout. [Canucks Army]
  • As more and more concussion-related lawsuits are filed against the NHL, a federal panel in the US has ruled that they be consolidated into one lawsuit. [New York Times]
  • Charles Wang has sold the New York Islanders to a group led by Jonathan Ledecky and Scott Malkin. [Islanders Insight]
  • A look into some of the barriers to hockey analytics, including the general attitude of those knowledgeable and experienced with advanced stats towards newcomers. [Upper Body Inquiry]

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Weekly Links: New lawsuit filed by former players; Growth of hockey analytics; CHL/ECHL merger; and more!

Source: NHL.com

Source: NHL.com

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • With the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs hiring the league’s first ever woman as a paid assistant coach, Ryan Kennedy wonders if and when we might see a female coach in the NHL. [The Hockey News]
  • A good look at sexism in hockey and fans’ increasing dissatisfaction with practices that objectify or marginalize women. [Hockey Broad]
  • A group of former NHL players are suing the league, accusing the league of marketing and profiting from extreme violence. [TSN]
  • With the recent hirings of Tyler Dellow and Eric Tulsky by NHL clubs, the online stats community is starting to get recognized for their work tracking and analyzing data. [SB Nation] [CBS Sports]
  • A look into the progress of hockey analytics, how it impacts the way we watch the game, and the future of the field. [Pension Plan Puppets]

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