Weekly Links: Taxes paid by NHL players; Attendance issues in Florida; History of Nassau Coliseum; Growth of women’s hockey in Mexico; and more

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Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A look into the different taxes NHL players pay depending on their province or state. Montreal is listed as the worst for players, while Florida and Nashville have lower tax rates. [TSN]
  • A recent NHL game in Florida was poorly attended, drawing criticism from fans who feel the market cannot sustain a professional hockey club. But other factors other than the market are impacting the poor attendance, including the team’s performance. [SB Nation]
  • An excellent profile of Nassau Coliseum, which the New York Islanders will be vacating to move to Brooklyn. [The Cauldron]

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Weekly Links: Reaction to Rogers’ NHL broadcast mega-deal; CWHL to be broadcast on Sportsnet; OHL launches mental health initiative; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Please check out our first of two posts on women’s hockey this week, which are using the IIHF’s Girls’ Hockey Weekend as an opportunity to discuss issues for women in hockey culture. The second piece will appear later this weekend. [Hockey in Society]
  • James Bradshaw takes an in-depth look at the 12-year mega-deal signed by Rogers for NHL broadcast rights, and how it will affect the Hockey Night in Canada programming and viewing experience. [The Globe and Mail]
  • Meanwhile, if you can get past the shameless self-promotion of Rogers, this Michael Grange piece gives some interesting insight into the company’s planned innovations for its broadcasts. [Sportsnet]
  • Katie Flynn has an excellent critique of the exclusion of many qualified women from the Rogers broadcast team – definitely a must read. [Pension Plan Puppets]
  • Clare Austen was frustrated by an interview with US hockey star Hilary Knight, who recently practiced with the Anaheim Ducks, which was posted on Puck Daddy. She critiques the substance of the interview and poses a series of questions that would provide deeper insight into issues and opportunities in women’s hockey. [Puckology]
  • Some small but important steps for the CWHL this year, as Sportsnet has signed on to broadcast the Clarkson Cup playoffs and an as-yet-to-be-named special event. [Sportsnet]
  • Unfortunately for women in NCAA hockey, there is no such TV deal for their competitions. Eric Burton explores why this is the case and argues for it change. [The Hockey Writers]

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Weekly Links: Lack of female analysts in NHL broadcasts; Player contracts impacted by sanctions on Russia; International Champions League; ECHL-CHL merger finalized; and more

Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City, Missouri

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Katie Flynn of The Score looks into the changes to the Sportsnet hockey broadcast team, and the lack of female analysts. [Pension Plan Puppets]
  • The economic sanctions placed on Russia by the US, Canada and Europe following their annexation of Crimea may have an impact on future player contracts. The NHLPA is advising player agents that contracts signed with KHL clubs may violate the current sanctions, possibly resulting in financial or criminal punishments. [TSN]

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Weekly Links: HNIC in Punjabi finds a new home, the Vancouver Sun finds itself in hot water, and learning to appreciate the CIS…

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Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Sledge hockey hero and paralympic gold medalist, Graeme Murray, will soon have an arena named after him in Gravenhurst, Ontario.  [Muskoka Daily]
  • The Vancouver Sun caused some controversy when a photo of Jordan Subban was captioned the “dark guy”.  Do you think this was inappropriate or not? [CTV News]
  • The Daily Townsman printed their opinion on the Subban incident arguing that the caption was anything but an isolated incident of accidental racism.  [Daily Townsman]
  • Hockey Night in Punjabi is moving to OMNI television, along with a bunch of other language commentaries! [TV-eh!]
  • Canadian inter university hockey doesn’t receive a lot of press when compared to the WHL, OHL or the minor leagues, but one blog encourages us to appreciate the oft-forgotten Canadian university hockey league. [Stanks' Sermon]
  • Young Canucks prospect, Mackenze Stewart, was born deaf and only started playing hockey at the age of 12. Read about his journey in [The National Post]
  • The Hockey Writers take on homophobia in hockey and the dominant ‘bro’ mentality found in hockey culture.  When will professional hockey have its first openly gay player? [The Hockey Writers]
  • It looks like hockey analytics is here to stay and college coaches are looking to make the most of their statistics. [College Hockey News]
  • This is not exactly from this week but we would be remiss not mention that Canadian Women’s Olympic team member and 2-time World Champion, Tessa Bonhomme, announced her retirement last week. [Hockey Canada]
  • The AHL announced a partnership with Upper Deck hockey cards.  Get your prospects now before they make the big leagues! (Do people still collect hockey cards?) [AHL]

Weekly Links: Lawsuit between Moore and Bertuzzi settled; Profile of Hobey Baker; Tension between traditional media and bloggers; Jamaican hockey; and more

Legendary broadcaster Foster Hewitt

Legendary broadcaster Foster Hewitt

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The lawsuit filed by Steve Moore, whose career was ended by Todd Bertuzzi, has been settled. Details of the settlement, however, will remain confidential. [Pro Hockey Talk]
  • An excellent piece on the life and times of Hobey Baker, a college standout in athletics. The annual Hobey Baker award is given to the top hockey player in NCAA. [Sports Illustrated]
  • A look back at the 1994 NHL lockout, including the events leading up to work stoppage and the key players involved. [Down Goes Brown]

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Weekly Links: Sexism in hockey media and fan groups; NHL expansion news and rumours; Ovechkin supports separatists in Ukraine?; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Alexander Ovechkin, who has a friendly relationship with Vladimir Putin, appears to be using social media to promote Russian propaganda and show his support the separatists in Ukraine. [Russian Machine Never Breaks]
  • Jen Mac Rammos calls out hockey media for being a sexist and exclusionary boys’ club. A very important piece and a definite must-read. [Fear the Fin]
  • Two University of Ottawa hockey players have been charged with sexual assault, following an incident in February that led to the suspension of the entire team. This article situates the incident in a broader culture of sexual entitlement and rape that pervades many sporting and university environments. [The Star]
  • An interview with Mike Burse, a hockey writer who is working to bring the advanced stats movement to women’s hockey and the CWHL. [Hockey Wilderness]

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Weekly Links: Moore-Bertuzzi case yet to be settled; New York Islanders sold; Canucks holding hockey camps in China; Ideas for an international champions league, and more

Source: New York Islanders

Source: New York Islanders

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The lawsuit filed by former NHL player Steve Moore against Todd Bertuzzi stemming from an on-ice incident has yet to be settled. The case was reported to be closed this week, but there are conflicting messages from both parties. [TSN]
  • It’s hard to believe that the Moore-Bertuzzi incident happened ten years ago. One fan re-lives the game and reflects on the build-up leading up to the attack, the “code” and the ensuing fallout. [Canucks Army]
  • As more and more concussion-related lawsuits are filed against the NHL, a federal panel in the US has ruled that they be consolidated into one lawsuit. [New York Times]
  • Charles Wang has sold the New York Islanders to a group led by Jonathan Ledecky and Scott Malkin. [Islanders Insight]
  • A look into some of the barriers to hockey analytics, including the general attitude of those knowledgeable and experienced with advanced stats towards newcomers. [Upper Body Inquiry]

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