Weekly Links: Debunking the value of enforcers; PK Subban polarizes Gen X and Gen Y; Blackhawks fans mobilize vs. sexism; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Good read by Mike Leonard debunking the notion that enforcers help deter violence against other players, with an analysis of Shawn Thornton’s time with the Boston Bruins. [Stanley Cup of Chowder]
  • Avi Goldberg interprets PK Subban’s relationship with Montreal Canadiens’ management and fans through the frame of generational differences. A very interesting read. [The Barnstormer]
  • Chicago Blackhawks fans mobilized against the team’s sexism during its intermission activities, and the team responded by removing the offending features. [Puck Daddy]
  • Adam Proteau reports that Canadian entrepreneur Arlene Dickinson has joined the board of the Canadian Women’s Hockey League, which is good news for the league. [The Hockey News]

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Weekly Links: PK Subban on the cost of playing hockey; Ex-NHLer John Rohloff suing NHL; Sabres’ owner to buy NFL’s Bills? And more

 

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

 

  • As his contract negotiations with Canadiens continue, P.K. Subban shares his insights on the state of the game, including the rising cost for parents. [National Post]
  • The Ontario Government is looking into potentially examining the working conditions of OHL players. [TSN]
  • Buffalo Sabres’ owner Terry Pegula is in the bidding to purchase the NFL’s Buffalo Bills, who’s owner Ralph Wilson passed away earlier this year. Andy Boron discusses the bid and its potential impact on the Sabres. [Die by the Blade]
  • John Rohloff, a veteran of 150 games for the Boston Bruins in the 1990s, is the latest to launch a lawsuit against the NHL for head trauma suffered during his career. [Puck Daddy]
  • The Hockey News looks back through its archives, and uncovers this quote from Bob Clarke about the arrival of Russian players in the NHL “I’ve never been in favor of the Soviets playing in the National Hockey League. . . .I have a lot of reasons in my own mind, one of which is probably prejudice.” [The Hockey News]
  • Adam Gretz looks back at the history of the Quebec Nordiques and their impact on the Colorado Avalanche, which they became in 1995. [SB Nation]
  • Speaking of Quebec, a new NHL-style arena is nearing completion even though the NHL has shown no inclination to expand to the city. [The Hockey News]
  • Greg Wyshynski on how the hiring of Kyle Dubas by the Toronto Maple Leafs represents a crack in the NHL’s Old Boy’s Club culture. [Puck Daddy]
  • Via SB Nation, Ann Frazier has put together a great video showing the location of NHL franchises from 1917 to the present:

Weekly Links: P.K. Subban targeted by racist Tweets; Larry Kwong honoured at Hall of Fame; Shifts in body-checking since the 1970s; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Larry Kwong is considered to be the first man of colour to play in the NHL, having suited up for one shift with the New York Rangers in the 1947-48 season. He is being honoured by having a jersey from his days with the Nanaimo Clippers displayed in the Hockey Hall of Fame. [Color of Hockey]
  • Avi Goldberg on notable issues surrounding Twitter during the NHL and NBA playoffs, including  a discussion of reaction to Ron Maclean’s comments about French Canadian referees on Hockey Night in Canada and the dangerous play of the Minnesota Wild’s Matt Cooke. [The Barnstormer]
  • PK Subban of the Montreal Canadiens was the target of racist tweets by Boston Bruins fans following Game 1 of the teams’ series, and his response to them has earned him praise from fans and journalists. [Habs Eyes on the Prize]
  • Nick Cotsonika discusses the cultural significance of the Canadiens in Montreal and the passion of their fans. [Yahoo Sports!]

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Weekly Links: Matt Cooke and dangerous body checking; Pro hockey culture in Denmark; AHL realignment; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The knives are out for Matt Cooke of the Minnesota Wild. Cooke has a history of injurious play and is a highly controversial NHL figure. He has avoided on-ice violent play for some years, but delivered a dangerous knee-on-knee hit to Tyson Barrie of the Colorado Avalanche during a recent playoff game. Eric Duhatschek gives an overview of Cooke’s history and argues that the NHL would be better off without him in the league. [Globe and Mail]
  • Meanwhile, an Ottawa Senators blogger defends Cooke’s actions in light of the broader culture surrounding body-checking in hockey. [Silver Seven]
  • A radical idea to address the behaviour of players like Cooke and the Bruins’ Milan Lucic: a player’s court, in which player representatives from each team would decide the severity of suspensions for dangerous plays. [2 Minutes for Hockey]
  • Patricia Teter has a great interview with former AHL player Kirill Tulupov who recently signed with Frederikshavn White Hawks of the Danish League. Tulupov discusses his experience as a player in Denmark, the local culture and the various fan traditions. [Artful Puck]
  • A gay man’s perspective on attending the NCAA Frozen Four tournament, and his hesitancy (but ultimate ability to safely) identify as gay in a heteronormative hockey fan culture. [Puck Buddys]

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Weekly Links: Cultural significance of Canadiens in Quebec; Boston arena upgrade without public money; Crowdfunding project for hockey analytics, and more

Source: CBC.ca

Source: CBC.ca

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Let the playoffs begin!! [SB Nation]
  • An essay on the cultural significance of the Montreal Canadiens in Quebec, in light of sociopolitical trends in the province.

    [The Barnstormer]

  • The Boston Bruins are completing $70 million of upgrades to the TD Garden this offseason and, shockingly, are doing so without asking for public money. Proof that profit-making sports teams can afford to finance their own stadiums? [Think Progress]
  • Corey Sznajder of the Shut Down Line blog is seeking funding for a unique project where he’ll be tracking and sharing specific hockey data. Corey will be tracking zone entries, which is not collected anywhere else and will be providing his results in exchange for a small donation to his project. [Go Fund Me]
  • Legal analyst Eric Macramalla gives some insight into what Ryan Malone can expect following his DUI and possession of cocaine. [TSN]
  • Some interesting analysis of goalie hot streaks and how difficult it can be to measure their performance at times. [FiveThirtyEight]
  • Economists with the Conference Board of Canada believe the economy can handle three additional NHL teams. Quebec City, Hamilton and a second team in Toronto were found to be favorable spots if the NHL were to expand. [Ottawa Citizen]
  • Eric Morris looks into the injury protocol for serious injuries, such as the one suffered by Daniel Sedin in the final game of the season. [Undisclosed Injury]
  • Facebook created a map of where fans of the playoff teams are located. [Business Insider]
  • Mark Pavelich, who won gold with Team USA in 1980 as a forward, is selling his medal for family reasons. [Yahoo!]
  • The NHL is facing another lawsuit from former players including Dave Christian, Reed Larson and William Bennett. The players are seeking compensation for the head injuries they suffered while in the NHL. [CBC]

Weekly Links, Bonus Sochi Edition: Should the NHL participate in the Olympics?; The status of women’s hockey at the Games; NCAA hockey alumni at Sochi; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

Editor’s note: Not surprisingly, most of the hockey world is focused on the Winter Olympics currently underway in Sochi, Russia. However, there is still great hockey writing being done about non-Olympics issues. This edition of the Weekly Links is thus divided into two posts: on Friday we posted non-Olympics links, while this post is devoted exclusively to writing about the Sochi Games. We hope you enjoy both posts!

  • There has been a great deal of discussion about whether NHL players should continue to participate in the Olympic Games. Ed Snider, owner of the Philadelphia Flyers, offered outspoken comments about the NHL’s participation in the Olympics, calling it “ridiculous.” [Broad Street Hockey]
  • Nick Cotsonika offers a good take on the dilemma posed to the NHL by Olympics participation, particularly given the popularity of the event with players like Zdeno Chara, who missed two Boston Bruins’ games to carry the Slovakian flag at the Opening Ceremonies. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • And Harrison Mooney also discusses whether the NHL should send players to the Games, arguing that the current situation “create[s] a situation where players have to serve two masters” – their club and their country. [Puck Daddy]

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Weekly Links: Reaction to Shawn Thornton’s attack on Brooks Orpik; Big news in Canadian women’s hockey; Academic conferences on hockey research; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The attack by the Boston Bruins’ Shawn Thornton on the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Brooks Orpik, which Courtney Szto discussed on this blog last weekend, has dominated the hockey headlines this week. Nicholas Cotsonika weighed in harshly against the act and the culture of violence in which it occurred. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Jonathan Willis discussed the incident and argued that the “grey area” around self-policing in hockey places players in untenable situations: “As long as the NHL persists in its tight-rope walk between policing the game and allowing the players to dispense . . . “frontier justice” it’s only going to be a matter of time until something like this happens again.” [Cult of Hockey]
  • Jay Rosehill of the Philadelphia Flyers came to Thornton’s defense in this lengthy interview. If you want an insight into the culture of hockey fighting and the “Code” then give this a listed. [Sportsnet]

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Edmonton’s November Project – Building Community Through Fitness

A few weeks ago, I saw an interesting tweet from Andrew Ference, the newest member of the Edmonton Oilers.

November Project

If you’re not familiar with the November Project, it’s  a year-round, outdoor group fitness class for anyone and everyone to join for free. It was started by a small group of people in Boston who were looking to get into shape without having to splurge on expensive equipment and memberships. Pretty quickly, using social media to announce locations, their sessions grew, with some workouts involving over 300 people. Today, the November Project has been established in Madison, WI and San Francisco. It really is a grassroots movement that emphasizes community and fitness.

One member of the November Project tribe is Andrew Ference who attended sessions as a player in Boston. Now that he’s a member of the Oilers, Ference is starting up a chapter here in Edmonton.

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Promoting Grassroots Participation while Building the Brand: To What Extent are NHL Teams Community Institutions?

Yesterday’s Globe and Mail ran an interesting article by James Mirtle about the Pittsburgh Penguins’ contributions to grassroots hockey in Western Pennsylvania. For the past four years, the Penguins, and in particular captain Sidney Crosby, have been extremely active in promoting hockey amongst Pittsburgh youth by providing free equipment and on-ice instruction. The initiative, while obviously having a major commercial motivation in terms of growing the Penguins’ business in the long-term, is an interesting example of how professional sport franchises can be more than simply entertainment spectacles and commercial enterprises, and actually invest socially in their local communities.

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Once again, hockey fans take to Twitter to hurl racist abuse at Joel Ward

Sadly, this was one of the less-offensive of the many derogatory tweets about Joel Ward this evening.

Less than two weeks ago, after Joel Ward scored in overtime of Game 7 to lead the Washington Capitals past the Boston Bruins, some hockey fans (many of whom identified as Bruins fans) took to Twitter to hurl racist abuse at the black Canadian forward from Toronto. While many fans of the Bruins and hockey more generally objected vociferously, clearly a significant amount of fans felt completely comfortable deploying racist epitaphs to insult the hockey player.

Tonight, Ward took a devastating penalty for the Capitals when, with just over 20 seconds remaining and the Capitals nursing a 2-1 lead, he high-sticked the New York Rangers’ Carl Hagelin and drew blood. The Rangers scored before the buzzer to send the game to overtime and then, with Ward still serving the second half of his double-minor, won the game on a goal by defenseman Marc Staal.

And then the Twitter racists returned in full force.

[WARNING: STRONG AND OFFENSIVE LANGUAGE APPEARS IN THE FOLLOWING IMAGES]

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