Weekly Links: Reaction to Voynov’s arrest for domestic violence; Ex-players’ lawsuit against the Canadian Hockey League; Szabados and Raty play in men’s pro leagues; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • After a gunman killed a Canadian reservist and attempted an attack on Parliament in Ottawa, the Pittsburgh Penguins played the Canadian anthem before their game against the Philadelphia Flyers as a show of respect. [Sportsnet]
  • The news that Slava Voynov of the Los Angeles Kings had been arrested for domestic violence has generated a huge amount of discussion and debate (currently charges are likely or will be dropped, depending on whether you listen to the DA or to his Voynov’s lawyer). Adam Proteau argues that the NHL should adopt a zero tolerance policy for domestic violence and ban players found guilty of this crime for life. [The Hockey News]
  • Meanwhile, writer stace_ofbase from Battle of California uses the Voynov case to discuss domestic violence more broadly and call for empathy for victims. [Battle of California]
  • NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman is receiving kudos, and favourable comparisons to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s handling of Ray Rice’s violent assault, for handling this situation swiftly and suspending Voynov indefinitely until a verdict is reached. I find it sad that this response even needs to be applauded rather than taken as granted, but given the pro sport world’s track record on domestic violence perhaps we need to start by pointing out when a league acts sensibly in response to a new incident. [Puck Daddy; Globe and Mail]
  • For those wondering about the moral quandary of cheering for athletes who do bad things off the ice/court/field, this scholarly roundtable discussion (written in light of the Ray Rice case) is fascinating reading. [The Allrounder]

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Weekly Links: Moore-Bertuzzi case yet to be settled; New York Islanders sold; Canucks holding hockey camps in China; Ideas for an international champions league, and more

Source: New York Islanders

Source: New York Islanders

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The lawsuit filed by former NHL player Steve Moore against Todd Bertuzzi stemming from an on-ice incident has yet to be settled. The case was reported to be closed this week, but there are conflicting messages from both parties. [TSN]
  • It’s hard to believe that the Moore-Bertuzzi incident happened ten years ago. One fan re-lives the game and reflects on the build-up leading up to the attack, the “code” and the ensuing fallout. [Canucks Army]
  • As more and more concussion-related lawsuits are filed against the NHL, a federal panel in the US has ruled that they be consolidated into one lawsuit. [New York Times]
  • Charles Wang has sold the New York Islanders to a group led by Jonathan Ledecky and Scott Malkin. [Islanders Insight]
  • A look into some of the barriers to hockey analytics, including the general attitude of those knowledgeable and experienced with advanced stats towards newcomers. [Upper Body Inquiry]

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Weekly Links: New lawsuit filed by former players; Growth of hockey analytics; CHL/ECHL merger; and more!

Source: NHL.com

Source: NHL.com

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • With the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs hiring the league’s first ever woman as a paid assistant coach, Ryan Kennedy wonders if and when we might see a female coach in the NHL. [The Hockey News]
  • A good look at sexism in hockey and fans’ increasing dissatisfaction with practices that objectify or marginalize women. [Hockey Broad]
  • A group of former NHL players are suing the league, accusing the league of marketing and profiting from extreme violence. [TSN]
  • With the recent hirings of Tyler Dellow and Eric Tulsky by NHL clubs, the online stats community is starting to get recognized for their work tracking and analyzing data. [SB Nation] [CBS Sports]
  • A look into the progress of hockey analytics, how it impacts the way we watch the game, and the future of the field. [Pension Plan Puppets]

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Weekly Links: KHL Arena burnt and robbed; Culture of late hits; Origins of Hockey; Inter league partnerships; and more

Source: Edmonton Oil Kings

Source: Edmonton Oil Kings

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Congrats to the Edmonton Oil Kings! 2014 Memorial Cup champions! [Cult of Hockey]
  • Pro-Russian militants burned and robbed the Druzhba Arena in the Ukraine, the home rink of HC Donbass of the KHL. [SB Nation]
  • James Mirtle looks at the issue of late hits, which have lead to a number of head injuries this season. [Globe & Mail]
  • A new book entitled “On the Origins of Hockey” brings forth the argument that hockey actually originated in England. [National Post]
  • A new partnership has been struck between KHL’s SKA St. Petersburg and the Swedish Hockey League’s HC Skellefteå to exchange ideas and experiences. It will be interesting to see what other partnerships between leagues can be struck. [SKA]

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Weekly Links: Cultural significance of Canadiens in Quebec; Boston arena upgrade without public money; Crowdfunding project for hockey analytics, and more

Source: CBC.ca

Source: CBC.ca

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Let the playoffs begin!! [SB Nation]
  • An essay on the cultural significance of the Montreal Canadiens in Quebec, in light of sociopolitical trends in the province.

    [The Barnstormer]

  • The Boston Bruins are completing $70 million of upgrades to the TD Garden this offseason and, shockingly, are doing so without asking for public money. Proof that profit-making sports teams can afford to finance their own stadiums? [Think Progress]
  • Corey Sznajder of the Shut Down Line blog is seeking funding for a unique project where he’ll be tracking and sharing specific hockey data. Corey will be tracking zone entries, which is not collected anywhere else and will be providing his results in exchange for a small donation to his project. [Go Fund Me]
  • Legal analyst Eric Macramalla gives some insight into what Ryan Malone can expect following his DUI and possession of cocaine. [TSN]
  • Some interesting analysis of goalie hot streaks and how difficult it can be to measure their performance at times. [FiveThirtyEight]
  • Economists with the Conference Board of Canada believe the economy can handle three additional NHL teams. Quebec City, Hamilton and a second team in Toronto were found to be favorable spots if the NHL were to expand. [Ottawa Citizen]
  • Eric Morris looks into the injury protocol for serious injuries, such as the one suffered by Daniel Sedin in the final game of the season. [Undisclosed Injury]
  • Facebook created a map of where fans of the playoff teams are located. [Business Insider]
  • Mark Pavelich, who won gold with Team USA in 1980 as a forward, is selling his medal for family reasons. [Yahoo!]
  • The NHL is facing another lawsuit from former players including Dave Christian, Reed Larson and William Bennett. The players are seeking compensation for the head injuries they suffered while in the NHL. [CBC]

Weekly Links: Slow adoption of hockey analytics, University of Ottawa hockey team suspended, Olympian Shannon Szabados practices with the Oilers

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Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Hockey was featured this past week at the 2014 Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, with a panel that included Brian Burke and Eric Tulsky of Broad Street Hockey. Unfortunately, due to the traditionalist mentality of NHL executives such as Burke, there continues to be resistance against the adoption of hockey analytics. [Boston Globe]
  • The University of Ottawa has suspended its hockey program for the duration of the year as police investigate a sexual assault involving the team. [Ottawa Citizen]
  • A hockey fan provides an excellent summary of their experience watching a KHL game in Slovakia. [Pension Plan Puppets]
  • Effective next season, parents of minor hockey players in the Ontario Minor Hockey Association will be required to take an online awareness course aimed at reducing bullying, abuse and harassment as part of the registration process. [Windsor Star]
  • An excellent interview of Cpl. Dominic Larocque, the captain of Canada’s national sledge hockey team. [Canada.com]
  • Shannon Szabados, goaltender of the Canadian women’s national  team that won gold in Sochi, was invited to practice with the Edmonton Oilers. [National Post]
  • Baycrest Health Sciences in Toronto has expanded their research on the brain health  of retired hockey players to include former University players as well. [CTV News]
  • A 180 year old hockey stick is up for auction this week. Researches have been able to determine the approximate age and the original owner of the hockey stick. [Yahoo!]

Weekly Links: Sexism in hockey media; the long-term impact of fighting and concussions; Markham and Edmonton arena news; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A great read on sexism in hockey media and blogging. Puck Daddy’s Jen Neale has assembled a panel of 10 female hockey bloggers, who discuss a range of related and insightful questions. Definitely worth a read. [Puck Daddy]
  • Interesting story as two Puck Buddys writers and Washington Capitals fans use social media app Grindr in an attempt to determine if many gay men attend Capitals game. [Puck Buddys]
  • Jeff MacGregor with a persuasive argument about fighting in the NHL. Among the many great lines: “The idea that fighting in hockey somehow curbs greater, dirtier violence committed with sticks or skates has never had any empirical support. There’s no evidence that it’s a safety valve — or even that the game needs one.” [ESPN]
  • Meanwhile, Seth Wickersham has a balanced look at the Montreal Canadiens’ George Parros and his views on fighting in hockey. Another excellent piece. [ESPN]

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