Weekly Links: Detroit’s new arena; Maple Leafs hire analytics expert; New rating system for helmets; Panthers no longer employ cheerleaders, and more

Source: CBC News

Source: CBC News

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A closer look into the plans for the new arena for the Detroit and the critical issues pertaining to its development and maintenance. [Kukla's Korner]
  • Meanwhile, taxpayers in Pennsylvania are still paying a heavy price for the Penguins rink. [Broad Street Hockey]
  • The Arizona Coyotes are facing another legal hurdle as the local mayor alleges that the agreement struck between the city and the teams ownership group may have broken state laws. [Five for Howling]
  • In its attempts to improve its international ranking, and thus qualify to claim its host berth at the 2018 Olympics, South Korea’s men’s program has hired Seoul-born former NHLer Jim Paek as its head coach. [Puck Daddy]
  • Scientists at Virginia Tech are developing a new rating system to measure how effective various hockey helmets are at preventing concussions. [New York Times]

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Weekly Links: Participation numbers in the US; New methods to reduce injuries; Tobacco use in hockey; Andrew Ference awarded the King Clancy Memorial Trophy; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

Source: LA Times

Source: LA Times

 

Congratulations to the LA Kings! Stanley Cup Champions!

  • As Hockey Night in Canada moves from CBC to Rogers, who will take control of the production, viewers can expect some major changes including more focus on players and less discussion on current events. [Eh Game]
  • A look into the San Jose Sharks’ television deal with Comcast and how it may force the club to relocate. [Inside Bay Area]
  • The story of Andew McKim, who suffered a severe concussion 14 years ago while playing overseas and continues to feel its effects. [National Post]
  • A hockey rink in Massachusetts is testing out a warning track around the perimeter to reduce the number of injuries along the boards. [CBS Boston]

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Weekly Links: Cost of hockey for parents; Potential NHL rule changes; Curbing fighting in junior hockey; Bettman’s comments about the season; Director of hockey analytics hired; and more

Source: Scouting the Refs

Source: Scouting the Refs

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A recent study found that the cost of hockey is roughly $1,600 per year, the most expensive compared to other activities. [CBC News]
  • USA Hockey’s board of director’s have approved rules to curtail fighting at the junior level. Also of note, the playing membership in the US is at an all time high. [United States of Hockey]
  • A look into the potential rule changes recommended by the NHL’s competition committee. Included are fines for embellishing,  an option for coaches to challenge calls and expanding video review. [Scouting the Refs]
  • The Canadian Women’s Hockey League is looking to add a second US franchise, with New York, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Detroit submitting bids. [ESPNW]
  • Team Canada goalie and Olympian, Charline Labonte recently spoke about being gay and experiencing the Sochi games with her partner, and Olympic speed skater Anastasia Buscis.  [Outsports]
  • A look into the some of the challenges NHL ice girls, or cheerleaders, deal with on a regular basis. [Mother Jones]

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Weekly Links: Stanley Cup Finals odds and ends; Arena discussions in Alberta cities; World Cup of Hockey set to return in 2016; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The Stanley Cup Finals are underway between the New York Rangers and Los Angeles Kings. Chris Johnston report that Los Angeles, not know as a hockey hotbed, appears to be embracing the Kings in a big way. [Sportsnet]
  • Meanwhile, the Rangers have captured the New York sports spotlight – but, asks Evan Sporer, for how long? [SB Nation]
  • The picture for this post is of Rangers fans watching Game 1 in Bryant Park in downtown Manhattan. You can check out the story here. [SB Nation]
  • Mike Spry has a great piece on the media narratives that tend to overtake and be overemphasized in the Stanley Cup Finals. [TSN BarDown]
  • Meanwhile, Arden Zwelling has an interesting behind-the-scenes look at media day during the Finals. [Sportsnet]
  • Finally, for Stanley Cup related news, Greg Wyshynski reports that the first game of the Finals drew large ratings in the US for NBC. [Puck Daddy]

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Deconstructing the Jersey Toss

"The medium is the message." (1964)

“The medium is the message.” (1964)

The jersey of any sports team, professional or not, holds a history, a story, and many different meanings. The message that resonates with any sports jersey is different depending on who is involved in the communication process. To some, the jersey simply designates who plays on what team. For others, a jersey holds significant, personal meaning which can be immersed in a narrative to build and share.

During two embarrassing losses on home ice this past season, two Edmonton Oilers jerseys were tossed by fans on to the ice. Both were acts of frustration and disapproval towards the club and their miserable performance. Many understood why the fans threw the jersey, while others, including Oilers goaltender Ben Scrivens, questioned why the jersey was used as the medium to send a message.

“I’m from (Edmonton). You’re not just disrespecting guys in the room you’re disrespecting guys who wore the jersey before us … Messier, Gretzky, they all take pride in wearing that jersey. You’re a fan, you get to say and do whatever you want, call me whatever name you want, but when it comes to that logo, that’s a sacred thing for us. It’s disheartening for me to see our fans treat it that way.” (Canoe.ca)

The crumpled jersey on the ice for all to see was significant because it was an extreme response to a poor performance. It brought to light the narratives, history and meaning we each have as fans of the team. And, aside from the disrespect to the past players as Scrivens pointed out, the toss of the jersey also challenged and disrupted the traditional communication channels sports fans have established with their team. Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Popularity of NHL teams; Edmonton Oilers honor First Nations community; Charles Wang potentially selling majority share of Islanders; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Bob Nicholson is set to resign as CEO of Hockey Canada. During his tenure, Canada has won seven Olympic gold medals, 12 world junior titles, five men’s world championships and 10 women’s world championships. [The Globe and Mail]
  • The Edmonton Oilers hosted a Celebration of First Nations Hockey last week as part of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada event. The club honored Fred Sasakamoose, the first Canadian of First Nations descent to play in the NHL, as well as other residential school hockey players and their descendants. The Oilers also announced that 20 spots at their annual hockey school will be held specifically for First Nations across Alberta. [Edmonton Oilers]
  • An interesting take on how junior players are being labelled as bullies by the league for their on-ice behavior. [National Post]
  • It appears that New York Islanders owner Charles Wang is looking to sell the majority of his stake in the franchise. [Lighthouse Hockey]
  • The two minor league players who staged a fight, that ended with a hug and a beer, have been suspended by the Federal Hockey League. [National Post]
  • Calgary Flames President Brian Burke continues to speak out against homophobia in hockey. [CBC]
  • A look into unregulated, “outlaw”, leagues, which are becoming a popular option for youth hockey players. [CBC]
  • Fifethirtyeight looked at the popularity of NHL teams based on Google searches. No surprise that the Habs and Leafs are at the top, while Nashville, Florida and Columbus are at the bottom. [FiveThirtyEight]
  • A very insightful piece on the importance of methods in hockey analytics.  [The Copper and Blue]
  • In case you missed it, the University of Alberta hosted a public lecture on hockey analytics. [University of Alberta]
  • And in honor of David Letterman, who is set to retire next year, a compilation of the top hockey moments on the Late Show. [Shnarped]

Weekly Links: Slow adoption of hockey analytics, University of Ottawa hockey team suspended, Olympian Shannon Szabados practices with the Oilers

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Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Hockey was featured this past week at the 2014 Sloan Sports Analytics Conference, with a panel that included Brian Burke and Eric Tulsky of Broad Street Hockey. Unfortunately, due to the traditionalist mentality of NHL executives such as Burke, there continues to be resistance against the adoption of hockey analytics. [Boston Globe]
  • The University of Ottawa has suspended its hockey program for the duration of the year as police investigate a sexual assault involving the team. [Ottawa Citizen]
  • A hockey fan provides an excellent summary of their experience watching a KHL game in Slovakia. [Pension Plan Puppets]
  • Effective next season, parents of minor hockey players in the Ontario Minor Hockey Association will be required to take an online awareness course aimed at reducing bullying, abuse and harassment as part of the registration process. [Windsor Star]
  • An excellent interview of Cpl. Dominic Larocque, the captain of Canada’s national sledge hockey team. [Canada.com]
  • Shannon Szabados, goaltender of the Canadian women’s national  team that won gold in Sochi, was invited to practice with the Edmonton Oilers. [National Post]
  • Baycrest Health Sciences in Toronto has expanded their research on the brain health  of retired hockey players to include former University players as well. [CTV News]
  • A 180 year old hockey stick is up for auction this week. Researches have been able to determine the approximate age and the original owner of the hockey stick. [Yahoo!]

Weekly Links: Evgeni Malkin’s journey to the NHL; The impact of HockeyFights.com; Critiquing MLSE’s military appreciation night

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

Editor’s note: Not surprisingly, most of the hockey world is focused on the Winter Olympics currently underway in Sochi, Russia. However, there is still great hockey writing being done about non-Olympics issues. This edition of the Weekly Links is thus divided into two posts: today, we post non-Olympics links and on Sunday we will publish a Weekly Links post exclusively devoted to writing about the Olympics. We hope you enjoy both posts!

  • A really interesting article by J. Brady McCollough on Evgeni Malkin’s journey from Magnitogorsk, Russia to the Pittsburgh Penguins in the NHL. [Pittsburgh Post-Gazette]
  • An interesting and balanced look at HockeyFights.com, the website that catalogs and celebrates fighters in the NHL and beyond. [Grantland]
  • Is the NHL ready to announce an expansion franchise in Seattle following the Sochi Olympics? [Raw Charge]

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Weekly Links: Olympics Set to Begin; Pilot project to draw more families into hockey; Impact of weaker Canadian dollar on Canadian NHL teams; and more

Source: Canada.com

Source: Canada.com

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • With the 2014 Olympics starting this week in Sochi, Sean Mcindoe provides a preview of the women’s hockey tournament including which players to watch. [Grantland]
  • Women’s hockey at the Olympic Games have been largely dominated by Canada and the US since its inception. Even though it was potentially dropped from the Games, women’s hockey continues to have strong financial support. [Huffington Post]
  • The folks over at Habs Eyes on the Prize have put together some excellent previews on all the hockey teams competing for gold in Sochi. Definitely worth reading. [Habs Eyes on the Prize]
  • Adam Proteau argues that, regardless of the result, Canadian hockey fans should remain humble about their team and limit the negativity towards other nations. [The Hockey News]
  • An interesting article that considers why Finland has produced, for its population size, such a large number of elite goaltenders. [New York Times]
  • Bauer and Hockey Canada are continuing to work on pilot projects to attract new families to the game. Their initial projects have increased the number of new players enrolling into local hockey programs. [Newswire]
  • In a recent study, the Retail Council of Canada found baby clothes and sports equipment costs have been reduced because of the elimination of tariffs by the federal government. [National Post]
  • Michael Grange examines the impact that a sinking Canadian dollar is having on Canadian NHL teams, and the league as a whole. [Sportsnet]
  • The organization Sports Without War launched a hoax Toronto Maple Leafs webpage to counter the organization’s relationship with and marketing of the Canadian Forces. The move drew widespread attention and sparked discussion around the relationship between sports and the military. In this interview, the activists explain their motivations. [VICE]
  • The merits of the plus/minus stat continue to be debated in the hockey world. Washington Capitals superstar Alexander Ovechkin serves as the case study. [SB Nation]
  • A remarkable story about a college goaltender who was born with one hand. [SB Nation]
  • An infographic on the attendance levels across the NHL [via Reddit].
  • A look into how losing franchises impact the psyche of their loyal fans. Case study: the Edmonton Oilers. [Edmonton Journal]

Weekly Links: Nichushkin adjusts to North American culture; Flames to provide more Punjabi content; Safety concerns at Sochi

Source: Hockey's Future

Source: Hockey’s Future

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Dave Lozo provides some insight into the cultural adjustments Valeri Nichushkin has made since staring his NHL career. The Russian rookie has had a rocky rookie season in Dallas but appears to be settling in nicely as his club chases a playoff spot. [Bleacher Report]
  • Katie Baker travels to Russia to explore Ilya Kovalchuk’s new career with SKA St. Petersburg and the broader politics of the Kontinental Hockey League. [Grantland]
  • Nick Cotsonika explains that a number of NHL players heading to Sochi for the upcoming Olympics are expressing concern about security at the Games, and as such many of them will not be accompanied by their families. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Ken Campbell argues that youth hockey players spend too much time practicing and playing, thus risking injury or missing other developmental opportunities. [The Hockey News]
  • The Calgary Flames announced that they will be providing more coverage in Punjabi. Harnarayan Singh, who currently provides Punjabi commentary for CBC broadcasts, will be producing weekly features to discuss the Flames. [Calgary Sun]
  • Former Edmonton Oilers head coach Ralph Kreuger has accepted a position with Southhampton football club in England. Kreuger is also currently working on the Team Canada coaching staff. [Inside Sports]
  • Carson Shields, a former junior player and now coach in the Manitoba Major Junior Hockey League is raising awareness to the issue of hazing. Hockey Canada continues to work with coaches and parents to prevent hazing incidents. [CBC News]
  • A Canadian freelance reporter has been arrested in the United States over allegations she threatened to kill her boyfriend, who plays in the WHL. [The Globe and Mail]
  • The men’s hockey program at the University of British Columbia is facing cancellation and has been asked by school administrators to provide a five year plan to receive support from the University. [Vancouver Sun]
  • In response to criticism from fans for their eighth straight losing season, Edmonton Oilers owner Daryl Katz released a letter to fans explaining his long term vision for the team and his support of the current management. The message was largely criticized for providing misleading information and lacking any real action plan. [The Copper and Blue]
  • Hockey Day in Canada ended with a line brawl between the Calgary Flames and Vancouver Canucks and resulted in both head coached receiving punishment from the NHL. Coach Bob Hartley was fined $25,000 for selecting enforcers to start the game, while coach John Tortorella was suspended for 15 days for trying to start an altercation in the Flames dressing room  during the first intermission. [Huffington Post]
  • Joe Pelletier provides an excellent summary of Team Canada’s performance at the 1984 Olympic Games in Sarajevo. [Greatest Hockey Legends]