Weekly Links: Gordie Howe suffers stroke; Impact of AHL’s Overtime rule changes; Largest stick tap for spinal research; and more

Gordie-Howe

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Best wishes to the legendary Gordie Howe who recently suffered a serious stroke. [SB Nation]
  • In case you missed it, here’s a recent interview of Gordie Howe….by Wayne Gretzky. [TSN Bardown]
  • While the You Can Play project has helped fight homophobia in North American hockey culture, Paul Wheeler reports that homophobia remains a serious problem in British professional hockey. [Chasing Dragons]
  • The Florida Panthers will be launching Spanish broadcasts of three games this season, in an effort to reach out to the Hispanic community of Miami. [Litter Box Cats]
  • Hockey Canada is attempting to improve the quality of Canadian goaltending through a learning exchange with Swedish and Finnish hockey federations. [Sportsnet]
  • Jack Jablonski, who suffered a severe spinal injury, is organizing the largest stick tap this weekend. Awareness is being raised for spinal research by this unique initiative. [Puck Daddy]
  • The story of Willy Alexander Thomas, an American youth hockey player, who committed suicide at the age of 17.  [New York Times]
  • Ottawa Senators prospect Brad Mills has been suspended for 20 games for violating the AHL’s performance-enhancing drug policy. [Metro News]
  • Rule changes pertaining to overtime sessions have reduced the number of shootouts in the AHL. A look into the rule change and the possibility of the NHL adopting similar policies. [The Hockey Writers]
  • A look at incentives and disincentives for removing fighting from hockey. [Arctic Ice Hockey]
  • Mementos in the digital age. A look into the decline of printed tickets. [Sport Heritage Review]

Weekly Links: Moore-Bertuzzi case yet to be settled; New York Islanders sold; Canucks holding hockey camps in China; Ideas for an international champions league, and more

Source: New York Islanders

Source: New York Islanders

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The lawsuit filed by former NHL player Steve Moore against Todd Bertuzzi stemming from an on-ice incident has yet to be settled. The case was reported to be closed this week, but there are conflicting messages from both parties. [TSN]
  • It’s hard to believe that the Moore-Bertuzzi incident happened ten years ago. One fan re-lives the game and reflects on the build-up leading up to the attack, the “code” and the ensuing fallout. [Canucks Army]
  • As more and more concussion-related lawsuits are filed against the NHL, a federal panel in the US has ruled that they be consolidated into one lawsuit. [New York Times]
  • Charles Wang has sold the New York Islanders to a group led by Jonathan Ledecky and Scott Malkin. [Islanders Insight]
  • A look into some of the barriers to hockey analytics, including the general attitude of those knowledgeable and experienced with advanced stats towards newcomers. [Upper Body Inquiry]

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A Story of 15 CHL Players, Together, On One Journey

Last year I had the privilege of speaking with 15 former and current CHL players. Below are their journeys, combined into one. Each paragraph comes from a different player’s story.


 

A Story of 15 Players, Together, on One Journey

Ever since I can remember I was on the ice.

My Grandpa would take me skating,
started out on the pond.
Those times were my first memories of hockey.

I asked my parents if I could be enrolled one year.
I asked if I could play.

I still remember my first loss.

I had a yellow jersey on.

I was in grade 4 and it was the second or third game of the season in house league.

My mom said I came off the ice bawling my eyes out.

I just think that right away I was pretty much hooked though,
for the game. Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Cost of hockey for parents; Potential NHL rule changes; Curbing fighting in junior hockey; Bettman’s comments about the season; Director of hockey analytics hired; and more

Source: Scouting the Refs

Source: Scouting the Refs

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A recent study found that the cost of hockey is roughly $1,600 per year, the most expensive compared to other activities. [CBC News]
  • USA Hockey’s board of director’s have approved rules to curtail fighting at the junior level. Also of note, the playing membership in the US is at an all time high. [United States of Hockey]
  • A look into the potential rule changes recommended by the NHL’s competition committee. Included are fines for embellishing,  an option for coaches to challenge calls and expanding video review. [Scouting the Refs]
  • The Canadian Women’s Hockey League is looking to add a second US franchise, with New York, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Detroit submitting bids. [ESPNW]
  • Team Canada goalie and Olympian, Charline Labonte recently spoke about being gay and experiencing the Sochi games with her partner, and Olympic speed skater Anastasia Buscis.  [Outsports]
  • A look into the some of the challenges NHL ice girls, or cheerleaders, deal with on a regular basis. [Mother Jones]

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Weekly Links: MLSE service workers strike, settle; Teenage boys must choose between CHL and NCAA; USA Hockey to ban fighting?

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, the multibillion dollar corporation that owns the Toronto Maple Leafs, settled with its striking concession and service workers this week. Final details have not yet been released, but the MLSE proposals included wage rollbacks or freezes for many employees. [Rank and File; Toronto Star]
  • Big news in junior hockey, as USA Hockey is looking into banning fighting at all levels of its amateur system, including the junior league the USHL. [SB Nation]
  • Amalie Benjamin of the Boston Globe has an inside look at the NHL’s Department of Player Safety, which is headed by Brendan Shanahan and responsible for fining and suspending players for dangerous play. [Boston Globe]

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Reaction to Shawn Thornton’s attack on Brooks Orpik; Big news in Canadian women’s hockey; Academic conferences on hockey research; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The attack by the Boston Bruins’ Shawn Thornton on the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Brooks Orpik, which Courtney Szto discussed on this blog last weekend, has dominated the hockey headlines this week. Nicholas Cotsonika weighed in harshly against the act and the culture of violence in which it occurred. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Jonathan Willis discussed the incident and argued that the “grey area” around self-policing in hockey places players in untenable situations: “As long as the NHL persists in its tight-rope walk between policing the game and allowing the players to dispense . . . “frontier justice” it’s only going to be a matter of time until something like this happens again.” [Cult of Hockey]
  • Jay Rosehill of the Philadelphia Flyers came to Thornton’s defense in this lengthy interview. If you want an insight into the culture of hockey fighting and the “Code” then give this a listed. [Sportsnet]

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Taylor Fedun’s Remarkable Comeback; Blackhawks Honored at the White House; Fallout from the Flyers-Capitals Line Brawl; Ken Dryden’s Response to Bobby Orr; and more

Source: NHL.com

Source: NHL.com

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Edmonton Oilers defenceman Taylor Fedun capped off a remarkable comeback to the NHL by scoring a goal in his first NHL game. The Princeton graduate shattered his leg almost two years on an icing play and missed an entire year due to the horrific injury. After playing a full season in the AHL, registering 27 points for the Oklahoma City Barons, Fedun returned to the NHL to resume his career. [Oil Spills]
  • The Chicago Blackhawks were honored at the White House by US President Barack Obama for their Stanley Cup championship. [Second City Hockey]
  • Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s new book A Great Game: The Forgotten Leafs & The Rise of Professional Hockey was officially released this week. Tony Keller provides an excellent book review. [The Globe and Mail]
  • Ray Emery and the Philadelphia Flyers have taken some heat for the line-brawl against Washington. Even though Emery went after Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby, who really wanted no part Emery, it doesn’t appear any suspensions are looming. [Broad Street Hockey] Read more of this post