Weekly Links: CWHL All-Star Game reaction; KHL impacted by falling Russian Ruble; NHL’s mumps outbreak; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • If you missed Alvin Ma’s post on the CWHL All-Star Game at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto, you can check it out here. [Hockey in Society]
  • Reina de la Isla and Zoë Hayden have both been doing great reporting on the CWHL this year. Here are their takes on the All-Star Game. [Hockey Wilderness; Stanley Cup of Chowder]
  • The plunging ruble is destabilizing the Russian economy and drastically affecting the Kontinental Hockey League. This is an interesting story worth following in the coming months. Here is some initial analysis from Dmitry Chesnokov and James Mirtle. [Puck Daddy; Globe and Mail]
  • How has the NHL been hit by an outbreak of mumps, a relatively rare disease? Matt McCarthy explores this outbreak, which has affected more than 13 players and two officials, including Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby. [Deadspin]

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Remembering Jean Beliveau; Research into testing for post-concussion syndrome; New KHL President; and more

Source: Habs Eyes on the Prize

Source: Habs Eyes on the Prize

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Montreal Canadiens legend Jean Beliveau passed away on Tuesday at the age of 83. Beliveau will be fondly remembered for not only his 17 Stanley Cups (10 as a player!) but also his relationship with fans. A terrible loss for the game. [Habs Eyes on the Prize] [CBC] [Montreal Gazette] [Puck Daddy]
  • Researchers at Pennsylvania University have found that a blood test would be able to predict the severity of post concussion syndrome in professional athletes. [UPHS]
  • A decline in the value of the Canadian dollar will have a significant impact on the NHL’s salary cap. A breakdown of how and why that happens. [New York Times]
  • The KHL has a new President: league founder Alexander Medvedev has stepped down, to be replaced by Dmitri Chernyshenko. [IIHF]
  • A short video remembering an outdoor hockey game played by Canadian troops during the Korean War. [CBC]
  • The Tamba Bay Lightning, along with other professional teams in Florida, have been relying on unpaid homeless people to work their concession stands. [Tampa Bay Times]
  • The Anschutz Entertainment Group is close to purchasing a majority stake in the Barclay’s Center, and is rumored to be opting out of the agreement with the New York Islanders. A look into this case and what it could mean for the NHL. [The Hockey Writers]
  • A look into how the Dallas Stars re-branded themselves, including the process of developing a new jersey. [Icethetics]
  • A great interview with Ottawa Senators General Manager Bryan Murray, who was diagnosed with cancer. [The Hockey News]
  • Hockey New Brunswick is putting up anti-bullying signs in hockey rinks across the province, hoping to create a more respectful attitude in the stands. [CBC]
  • Goaltender Martin Brodeur has officially joined the St. Louis Blues. Here’s a look into the evolution of his goaltending equipment over his career. [In Goal Magazine]
  • An excellent profile of Erie Otters’ Connor McDavid, who is projected as the top pick in the 2015 NHL Entry Draft. [SB Nation]
  • A look ahead to the new Epix show Road to the Winter Classic, which is replacing HBO’s popular 24/7 show.  [Puck Buddys]

Happy Birthday Šatan; or, How Should a Legend Retire?

The only pet I ever had was a small water turtle. I got it in the summer of 2002, and its name was Šarky (read as Shar-ke), as it was the most popular name in Slovakia at that time. You could hear it in phrases like “Šarky is God!” or “Šarky to the castle!” (in Slovakia this latter phrase doesn’t indicate any historic sightseeing, but becoming the country’s president). Šarky is not a regular given name, but it is the official nickname of Miroslav Šatan, a retired Slovak ice hockey player, who captained the national team to one gold, two silvers and a bronze in four World Championships, won the Stanley Cup with Pittsburgh Penguins in 2009 and never really said a “proper” goodbye to the ice hockey scene. On October 22, Šarky celebrated his 40th birthday and all of the Slovak media celebrated with him. However, you could sense some uncertainty about the recent position Šatan is occupying in the minds of Slovak sports fans.

If the Slovak ice hockey in the era of its independence (which means since 1993) was to have a synonym in a person of a single player, then it definitely is Miroslav Šatan. He played with the senior men’s team since 1992, moreover, the very next year he was also drafted to the NHL. As just a 19 year-old lad he was part of the Slovak national team, which after the split of the former ice-hockey empire – Czechoslovakia – was demoted to the lowest ‘C’ division. However, it took just 10 years and Šatan, as the team’s captain, was raising the top divisions’ World Championship trophy above his head. Maybe he was not as iconic a player back in those times as other notable Slovaks, Žigmund Pálffy, Peter Bondra or Pavol Demitra, but he definitely was considered to be the one defining the style Slovaks played.

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Lack of female analysts in NHL broadcasts; Player contracts impacted by sanctions on Russia; International Champions League; ECHL-CHL merger finalized; and more

Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City, Missouri

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Katie Flynn of The Score looks into the changes to the Sportsnet hockey broadcast team, and the lack of female analysts. [Pension Plan Puppets]
  • The economic sanctions placed on Russia by the US, Canada and Europe following their annexation of Crimea may have an impact on future player contracts. The NHLPA is advising player agents that contracts signed with KHL clubs may violate the current sanctions, possibly resulting in financial or criminal punishments. [TSN]

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Moore-Bertuzzi case yet to be settled; New York Islanders sold; Canucks holding hockey camps in China; Ideas for an international champions league, and more

Source: New York Islanders

Source: New York Islanders

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The lawsuit filed by former NHL player Steve Moore against Todd Bertuzzi stemming from an on-ice incident has yet to be settled. The case was reported to be closed this week, but there are conflicting messages from both parties. [TSN]
  • It’s hard to believe that the Moore-Bertuzzi incident happened ten years ago. One fan re-lives the game and reflects on the build-up leading up to the attack, the “code” and the ensuing fallout. [Canucks Army]
  • As more and more concussion-related lawsuits are filed against the NHL, a federal panel in the US has ruled that they be consolidated into one lawsuit. [New York Times]
  • Charles Wang has sold the New York Islanders to a group led by Jonathan Ledecky and Scott Malkin. [Islanders Insight]
  • A look into some of the barriers to hockey analytics, including the general attitude of those knowledgeable and experienced with advanced stats towards newcomers. [Upper Body Inquiry]

Read more of this post

Mark Popovic, KHL player and former NHLer, on hockey culture and labour vs. passion in a pro career

This is one in a series of posts in which I will report back from The Hockey Conference that I attended in London, ON from June 18-20, 2014. As I did not digitally record any of the proceedings, any direct quotations may contain slight inaccuracies – however, I have endeavored to capture the essence of the commentary and to reproduce it as accurately as possible.

The first keynote of the conference featured Mark Popovic, a former NHL player who played 81 games over five seasons with the Anaheim Ducks and Atlanta Thrashers, and current player with Croatian club Zagreb Medvescak of the KHL. For reference, you can view his career stats here.

The keynote took a unique form, as conference organizer and Western University sport historian Dr. Don Morrow conducted a one-on-one interview in the vein of the popular Inside the Actor’s Studio television program. Popovic was gracious and forthcoming with his answers, although, as will be discussed, there was a contradiction in his views on the labour process in hockey that was not adequately resolved during the session. Nonetheless, Popovic provided great insight into the life of a professional hockey player and some of the struggles, challenges and rewards of this career. After the jump, I review three of the interesting themes that emerged from this session: hockey as labour, players as commodities, and the expression of passion and love for the sport. I conclude by briefly attempting to explore the apparent contradictions between the first two topics and the latter one. Read more of this post

Weekly Links: New lawsuit filed by former players; Growth of hockey analytics; CHL/ECHL merger; and more!

Source: NHL.com

Source: NHL.com

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • With the NBA’s San Antonio Spurs hiring the league’s first ever woman as a paid assistant coach, Ryan Kennedy wonders if and when we might see a female coach in the NHL. [The Hockey News]
  • A good look at sexism in hockey and fans’ increasing dissatisfaction with practices that objectify or marginalize women. [Hockey Broad]
  • A group of former NHL players are suing the league, accusing the league of marketing and profiting from extreme violence. [TSN]
  • With the recent hirings of Tyler Dellow and Eric Tulsky by NHL clubs, the online stats community is starting to get recognized for their work tracking and analyzing data. [SB Nation] [CBS Sports]
  • A look into the progress of hockey analytics, how it impacts the way we watch the game, and the future of the field. [Pension Plan Puppets]

Read more of this post