Weekly Links: Rumoured NHL expansion to Las Vegas; The impact of the NHL salary cap; New arena for Ottawa Senators?; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The NHL continues its slow waltz toward expanding to Las Vegas. Nick Costonika reports the latest from the NHL Board of Governors meeting. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • A critique of the NHL’s chances to succeed in Las Vegas.  [Canucks Army]
  • The Ottawa Senators are exploring building a new downtown arena, which would see them move from the suburb of Kanata to the city centre.  [Sportsnet]
  • A long-form article on the Montreal Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban, and his polarizing reputation around the NHL.   [The New Yorker]
  • Lyle Richardson gives a good myth-busting overview of some of the impacts of the NHL salary cap. [Spector’s Hockey]

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Weekly Links: Remembering Jean Beliveau; Research into testing for post-concussion syndrome; New KHL President; and more

Source: Habs Eyes on the Prize

Source: Habs Eyes on the Prize

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Montreal Canadiens legend Jean Beliveau passed away on Tuesday at the age of 83. Beliveau will be fondly remembered for not only his 17 Stanley Cups (10 as a player!) but also his relationship with fans. A terrible loss for the game. [Habs Eyes on the Prize] [CBC] [Montreal Gazette] [Puck Daddy]
  • Researchers at Pennsylvania University have found that a blood test would be able to predict the severity of post concussion syndrome in professional athletes. [UPHS]
  • A decline in the value of the Canadian dollar will have a significant impact on the NHL’s salary cap. A breakdown of how and why that happens. [New York Times]
  • The KHL has a new President: league founder Alexander Medvedev has stepped down, to be replaced by Dmitri Chernyshenko. [IIHF]
  • A short video remembering an outdoor hockey game played by Canadian troops during the Korean War. [CBC]
  • The Tamba Bay Lightning, along with other professional teams in Florida, have been relying on unpaid homeless people to work their concession stands. [Tampa Bay Times]
  • The Anschutz Entertainment Group is close to purchasing a majority stake in the Barclay’s Center, and is rumored to be opting out of the agreement with the New York Islanders. A look into this case and what it could mean for the NHL. [The Hockey Writers]
  • A look into how the Dallas Stars re-branded themselves, including the process of developing a new jersey. [Icethetics]
  • A great interview with Ottawa Senators General Manager Bryan Murray, who was diagnosed with cancer. [The Hockey News]
  • Hockey New Brunswick is putting up anti-bullying signs in hockey rinks across the province, hoping to create a more respectful attitude in the stands. [CBC]
  • Goaltender Martin Brodeur has officially joined the St. Louis Blues. Here’s a look into the evolution of his goaltending equipment over his career. [In Goal Magazine]
  • An excellent profile of Erie Otters’ Connor McDavid, who is projected as the top pick in the 2015 NHL Entry Draft. [SB Nation]
  • A look ahead to the new Epix show Road to the Winter Classic, which is replacing HBO’s popular 24/7 show.  [Puck Buddys]

On Beliveau, Masculinity and “Class”

Image courtesy of the Guardian

Upon hearing the news of Jean Beliveau’s passing a few days ago, I was immediately taken back to my most enduring and endearing memory of Le Gros Bill. In a past life, a time when I thought a career spent toiling away in academia was for suckers (and yet here I am), I worked in numerous capacities at the Hockey Hall of Fame – some glamourous, some not so glamourous. One of my jobs at the annual Hall of Fame Induction ceremonies was to patrol the front of the hotel at which most honoured members in town for the event would stay. I was responsible for escorting the various Hall of Famers and their families through the crowd of (often aggressive, almost always professional) autograph seekers to the limo bus that would then take them to the red carpet at Yonge and Front.

One of the people I had to guide through this organized chaos each year was Jean Beliveau. As the flood of tributes after his death demonstrate, he is revered as a hockey legend and beloved by most with a knowledge of the sport’s history. This well-deserved respect and public veneration makes memorabilia featuring his likeness or signature worth a pretty penny (and like an artistic masterpiece, the value of this type of merchandise has undoubtedly increased after his passing). For me on Induction night, this meant the assembled horde of “fans” carrying unsigned pieces of memorabilia were especially eager for a moment of Mr. Beliveau’s time.

One year, I met him at the top of the hotel ramp, (re-)introduced myself, and began leading him and his wife toward the curb where the bus was waiting. With the help of a co-worker, I attempted to shield them from the hungry mob gathered in front of the hotel. He stopped a couple times and politely signed some autographs; meanwhile my co-worker and I absorbed more than a few shoves, jabs and insults from members of the crowd who were less than pleased with our efforts to keep them from obtaining their big ticket item (that would almost always be up for sale on eBay the next morning). We finally got Jean and Elise to the doors of the bus and we wished them a pleasant evening. But before the doors closed, Beliveau lightly grabbed my shoulder and asked, “Are you okay?” After I assured him that I was just fine, he patted me on the back and said “Great. You’re doing a great job. Thank you.” On a night entirely organized around treating these “honoured members” like unparalleled VIPs, he cared enough to stop for a second and ask how I was doing. This was certainly not a heroic or courageous deed; but it was an example of a genuine act of kindness and gratitude from a man who by all accounts was chalk full of them.

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Hockey Research at the 2014 North American Society for the Sociology of Sport (NASSS) Conference

One of the things we like to do at Hockey in Society is highlight current sociocultural research about hockey being done by scholars across the globe (you can see various posts related to academic conferences here). Last week, the annual conference for the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport (NASSS), a scholarly association for sport sociologists, took place in Portland, Oregon. Unfortunately I was not able to attend, but the program is published online, so I am still able to highlight the research being presented that it relevant to the critical study of hockey and its place in society.

After the jump, check out the abstracts from relevant presentations (including from Hockey in Society writers Courtney Szto and Matt Ventresca). Topics include entrepreneurship and the formation of all-Black sport leagues (including the Colored Hockey League in the Canadian Maritimes) in the Reconstruction Era; racialized media media representations of black players, including the Montreal Canadiens’ P.K. Subban; the demise of Hockey Night in Canada and La soirée du hockey and the loss of hockey on Canada’s pubic broadcasters; social media reaction to Punjabi hockey broadcasts; and concussions in sport.

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Weekly Links: Taxes paid by NHL players; Attendance issues in Florida; History of Nassau Coliseum; Growth of women’s hockey in Mexico; and more

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Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A look into the different taxes NHL players pay depending on their province or state. Montreal is listed as the worst for players, while Florida and Nashville have lower tax rates. [TSN]
  • A recent NHL game in Florida was poorly attended, drawing criticism from fans who feel the market cannot sustain a professional hockey club. But other factors other than the market are impacting the poor attendance, including the team’s performance. [SB Nation]
  • An excellent profile of Nassau Coliseum, which the New York Islanders will be vacating to move to Brooklyn. [The Cauldron]

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Weekly Links: Debunking the value of enforcers; PK Subban polarizes Gen X and Gen Y; Blackhawks fans mobilize vs. sexism; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Good read by Mike Leonard debunking the notion that enforcers help deter violence against other players, with an analysis of Shawn Thornton’s time with the Boston Bruins. [Stanley Cup of Chowder]
  • Avi Goldberg interprets PK Subban’s relationship with Montreal Canadiens’ management and fans through the frame of generational differences. A very interesting read. [The Barnstormer]
  • Chicago Blackhawks fans mobilized against the team’s sexism during its intermission activities, and the team responded by removing the offending features. [Puck Daddy]
  • Adam Proteau reports that Canadian entrepreneur Arlene Dickinson has joined the board of the Canadian Women’s Hockey League, which is good news for the league. [The Hockey News]

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Weekly Links: PK Subban on the cost of playing hockey; Ex-NHLer John Rohloff suing NHL; Sabres’ owner to buy NFL’s Bills? And more

 

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

 

  • As his contract negotiations with Canadiens continue, P.K. Subban shares his insights on the state of the game, including the rising cost for parents. [National Post]
  • The Ontario Government is looking into potentially examining the working conditions of OHL players. [TSN]
  • Buffalo Sabres’ owner Terry Pegula is in the bidding to purchase the NFL’s Buffalo Bills, who’s owner Ralph Wilson passed away earlier this year. Andy Boron discusses the bid and its potential impact on the Sabres. [Die by the Blade]
  • John Rohloff, a veteran of 150 games for the Boston Bruins in the 1990s, is the latest to launch a lawsuit against the NHL for head trauma suffered during his career. [Puck Daddy]
  • The Hockey News looks back through its archives, and uncovers this quote from Bob Clarke about the arrival of Russian players in the NHL “I’ve never been in favor of the Soviets playing in the National Hockey League. . . .I have a lot of reasons in my own mind, one of which is probably prejudice.” [The Hockey News]
  • Adam Gretz looks back at the history of the Quebec Nordiques and their impact on the Colorado Avalanche, which they became in 1995. [SB Nation]
  • Speaking of Quebec, a new NHL-style arena is nearing completion even though the NHL has shown no inclination to expand to the city. [The Hockey News]
  • Greg Wyshynski on how the hiring of Kyle Dubas by the Toronto Maple Leafs represents a crack in the NHL’s Old Boy’s Club culture. [Puck Daddy]
  • Via SB Nation, Ann Frazier has put together a great video showing the location of NHL franchises from 1917 to the present: