Weekly Links: NHL Draft reaction; Mike Fisher’s support for Hobby Lobby; Is the KHL a no longer a threat to the NHL?

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Great read on the Skillz Black Aces, a Toronto boy’s team mostly composed of black youth, which had three of its former players drafted in the 2014 NHL Entry Draft. [Color of Hockey]
  • Speaking of the NHL Draft, Steve Dangle interviewed hockey agents Aaron Schwartz and Darryl Wolski about their work, young players, and the Draft. [Leafs Nation]
  • Chris Johnston argues that, in light of signings of KHL players like Leo Komorov by NHL teams and the suspension of some teams, the KHL is not a threat to the NHL as a league/business. [Sportsnet]
  • The amount of the lawsuit brought by Steve Moore against Todd Bertuzzi and the Vancouver Canucks, stemming from Bertuzzi’s 2004 attack on Moore, has increased based on expectations of future earnings. [Puck Daddy]
  • Mike Fisher tweeted his support of Hobby Lobby’s recent US Supreme Court victory. While his stance is controversial, Jason Kay argues that hockey fans should be supportive of his right to express his political views in a public forum. [The Hockey News]
  • An interview with Sean Ramjagsingh, one of the producers for EA Sports’ NHL 15, about the upcoming video game, which will be released in September. [Last Word on Sports]
  • With rumours swirling about NHL expansion to Seattle, and now Wayne Gretzky’s involvement in a potential ownership group, Gretzky’s agent has denied that he will be involved. [The Score]

On “NHL Bloodlines” and Social and Cultural Capital: Why Do NHL Fathers Produce NHL Sons?

In its preview of the 2014 NHL Entry Draft, The Hockey News features a Matt Larkin article entitled “Rising Son,” the subtitle of which reads: “Former NHLers’ sons, other relatives are on the radar as top prospects.” Larkin’s piece highlights no fewer than 22 draft eligible players with fathers, uncles, or brothers who used to or currently play in the NHL, including the sons of notable ex-NHLers such as Pierre Turgeon, Claude Lemieux, Al MacInnis, and Glen Wesley. Furthermore, three sons of former NHL regulars are expected to be drafted in the top 10: Sam Reinhart (son of Paul Reinhart and brother of NHL draftees Max and Griffin), Kasperi Kapanen (son of Sami Kapanen), and William Nylander (son of Michael Nylander).

Meanwhile, there are numerous current and past NHLers whose fathers enjoyed successful careers. The Howe family may be the most famous of these, with father Gordie playing along his sons Marty and Mark for the New England/Hartford Whalers of the World Hockey Association in the 1970s. Bobby and Brett Hull are another well-known father/son duo. Current NHLers whose fathers also played in the league include Paul Stastny (son of Peter), Nick Foligno (son of Mike), Brandon Sutter (son of Brent), Alexander Steen (son of Thomas), and Jarred Tinordi (son of Mark). And more players of famous lineage may never become regulars in the NHL, despite their hockey pedigree: Ray Bourque and Patrick Roy, for example, both have sons toiling in the KHL and AHL respectively.

The intergenerational success of these hockey families is often explained in popular discourse as a product of genetics or “bloodlines.” Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Participation numbers in the US; New methods to reduce injuries; Tobacco use in hockey; Andrew Ference awarded the King Clancy Memorial Trophy; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

Source: LA Times

Source: LA Times

 

Congratulations to the LA Kings! Stanley Cup Champions!

  • As Hockey Night in Canada moves from CBC to Rogers, who will take control of the production, viewers can expect some major changes including more focus on players and less discussion on current events. [Eh Game]
  • A look into the San Jose Sharks’ television deal with Comcast and how it may force the club to relocate. [Inside Bay Area]
  • The story of Andew McKim, who suffered a severe concussion 14 years ago while playing overseas and continues to feel its effects. [National Post]
  • A hockey rink in Massachusetts is testing out a warning track around the perimeter to reduce the number of injuries along the boards. [CBS Boston]

Read more of this post

Hockey Research at the 2014 “Putting it on Ice” Conference

Starting tomorrow in London, ON, hockey researchers and academics will gather at Western University for the fourth Putting it on Ice Conference. This conference, which was last held in Halifax, NS in 2012, is exclusively focused on scholarship related to hockey, whether that be sociological, political, historical, media, literary or economic research. Not surprisingly, there are lots and lots of fascinating papers being presented this year that align with the interests and focus of this blog – and I am happy to say that I will be in attendance to hear them all. While I don’t have space to summarize every paper that will be on the program, after the jump I have copied and pasted the titles and abstracts of just some of the papers I am particularly interested in – but I am sure that many other papers will also catch my interest and stimulate my intellect! You can check out the full program here and the abstracts here.

Full disclosure: I am co-presenting a paper, with Tobias Stark from Linnaeus University in Sweden, which for the sake of interest I am including in the selection of abstracts below.

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Cost of hockey for parents; Potential NHL rule changes; Curbing fighting in junior hockey; Bettman’s comments about the season; Director of hockey analytics hired; and more

Source: Scouting the Refs

Source: Scouting the Refs

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A recent study found that the cost of hockey is roughly $1,600 per year, the most expensive compared to other activities. [CBC News]
  • USA Hockey’s board of director’s have approved rules to curtail fighting at the junior level. Also of note, the playing membership in the US is at an all time high. [United States of Hockey]
  • A look into the potential rule changes recommended by the NHL’s competition committee. Included are fines for embellishing,  an option for coaches to challenge calls and expanding video review. [Scouting the Refs]
  • The Canadian Women’s Hockey League is looking to add a second US franchise, with New York, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Detroit submitting bids. [ESPNW]
  • Team Canada goalie and Olympian, Charline Labonte recently spoke about being gay and experiencing the Sochi games with her partner, and Olympic speed skater Anastasia Buscis.  [Outsports]
  • A look into the some of the challenges NHL ice girls, or cheerleaders, deal with on a regular basis. [Mother Jones]

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: NHL playoff violence; IIHF re-launches a European Champions League; NHL expansion speculation; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The series between the Montreal Canadiens and New York Rangers is getting violent, with Brandon Prust earning a suspension for breaking Derek Stepan’s jaw with an illegal check and Dan Carcillo getting a 10-game suspension for aggression against a linesman while trying to get after Prust. Ken Campbell weighs in by criticizing the NHL for its disciplinary standards tacit condoning of violence: “The NHL and its culture of violence is every bit as culpable for all of this as the perpetrators were.” [The Hockey News]
  • Despite (or bolstered by?) the violence that characterizes seemingly every NHL playoffs, TV ratings in the US are doing well. [Puck Daddy]
  • Interesting read about advanced stats in hockey compared to the power of narratives to shape perception. Definitely worth a read. [Puckology]

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Hockey growth in the US and abroad; Belarus regime continues to face protests; Racism in hockey; NHL to introduce new tracking technology; and more

 

Source: Edmonton Oil Kings

Source: Edmonton Oil Kings

 

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Congratulations to the Edmonton Oil Kings on winning the Ed Chynoweth Cup! [Cult of Hockey]
  • An international group of artists published a public letter, urging players at the World Championships in Belarus to support the protest movement against dictator Alexander Lukashenko, who they argue is using the tournament to legitimize his regime. [The Guardian]
  • Harrison Mooney looks at the way black NHL players like PK Subban and Evander Kane are treated by the NHL, the media and the fan community. [Puck Daddy]
  • Over the past five years, participation in ice hockey in the US has grown 5.1%. [FiveThirtyEight]

Read more of this post

Weekly Links: Cultural significance of Canadiens in Quebec; Boston arena upgrade without public money; Crowdfunding project for hockey analytics, and more

Source: CBC.ca

Source: CBC.ca

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Let the playoffs begin!! [SB Nation]
  • An essay on the cultural significance of the Montreal Canadiens in Quebec, in light of sociopolitical trends in the province.

    [The Barnstormer]

  • The Boston Bruins are completing $70 million of upgrades to the TD Garden this offseason and, shockingly, are doing so without asking for public money. Proof that profit-making sports teams can afford to finance their own stadiums? [Think Progress]
  • Corey Sznajder of the Shut Down Line blog is seeking funding for a unique project where he’ll be tracking and sharing specific hockey data. Corey will be tracking zone entries, which is not collected anywhere else and will be providing his results in exchange for a small donation to his project. [Go Fund Me]
  • Legal analyst Eric Macramalla gives some insight into what Ryan Malone can expect following his DUI and possession of cocaine. [TSN]
  • Some interesting analysis of goalie hot streaks and how difficult it can be to measure their performance at times. [FiveThirtyEight]
  • Economists with the Conference Board of Canada believe the economy can handle three additional NHL teams. Quebec City, Hamilton and a second team in Toronto were found to be favorable spots if the NHL were to expand. [Ottawa Citizen]
  • Eric Morris looks into the injury protocol for serious injuries, such as the one suffered by Daniel Sedin in the final game of the season. [Undisclosed Injury]
  • Facebook created a map of where fans of the playoff teams are located. [Business Insider]
  • Mark Pavelich, who won gold with Team USA in 1980 as a forward, is selling his medal for family reasons. [Yahoo!]
  • The NHL is facing another lawsuit from former players including Dave Christian, Reed Larson and William Bennett. The players are seeking compensation for the head injuries they suffered while in the NHL. [CBC]

Weekly Links: Sochi reactions and news; Marginalization of female hockey fans; Buffalo building massive downtown hockey complex

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • I just discovered the blog Puckology this week, and it’s pretty great! This article from Clare Austin gives an insightful commentary of how women hockey fans are rendered invisible in marketing. [Puckology]
  • New Englander Charles Pierce reflects on a lifetime of Montreal Canadiens fandom, including comments on Habs legends Jean Beliveau and Ken Dryden. [Grantland]
  • The Ontario Hockey League is stepping up its compensation package for its players, which is huge news. Check out Vicky Grygar’s great piece on this topic that was published on this blog last year for another take. [Sportsnet]
  • In light of Nicklas Backstrom’s failed drug test, which caused him to miss the men’s Gold Medal game between Sweden and Canada, Justin Bourne discusses prescription drug (ab)use in hockey. [Backhand Shelf]
  • Evgeni Malkin and Alex Ovechkin were apparently extremely frustrated with the management of Russia’s Olympic team in Sochi. Some really interesting commentary on the politics of the KHL and Russian hockey. [Pittsburgh TribLive]

Read more of this post

Olympic Dissonance

Games Against a Messy Background

from thestar.com

Sport lends itself to a condition of moral simplicity. A major reason we turn to sport is for the undeniable certainty of its win/loss, rule-bound dynamic. At no time does sport’s artificial certainty stand out more than it does at the Olympics, because at no other time does it clash more with the deviousness of the world at large. Like the World Cup, the Olympics produces the same tension each time: between the simplified morality of sport itself and the problematic morality of the forces that control sport, or of the nations represented.

Putin’s games provide a case in point of that. Read more of this post