Weekly Links: Vladimir Putin and the politics of the KHL; A review of Derek Boogaard biography; Jack Johnson’s bankruptcy; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!.

  • If you missed it, check out Sunil Agnihotri’s take on the rise and demise of Cap Geek. [Hockey in Society]
  • I wrote a review of John Branch’s new book, Boy on Ice: The Life and Death of Derek Boogaard for The All Rounder. The book builds on the fantastic reporting Branch did for his insightful series of 2011 reports on Boogaard’s life and passing. [The All Rounder]
  • A really interesting look at the KHL and Vladimir Putin’s political relationship with hockey, the power of which is jeopardized by Russia’s current economic crisis. [Vice Sports]
  • A detailed look at the sad and cautionary story of NHL star Jack Johnson, who declared bankruptcy after his parents, who controlled his finances, blew through his millions in career earnings. [Deadspin]

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CapGeek, Hockey Analytics and the NHL’s Reluctance to Provide Information

CapGeek has announced that it would be ceasing operations as its founder and director, Matthew Wuest attends to some personal matters. CapGeek was the definitive source for NHL salary information used by fans, NHL teams and media outlets. It also provided interactive tools to determine if teams could take on player salaries, a cap calculator for armchair GM’s and what future rosters could potentially look like. It really improved the public’s understanding of the salary cap model and the numerous financial intricacies involved in building NHL rosters.

The website filled a need after the NHL implemented the salary cap in 2005. Team’s were no longer able to outspend one another and had to find a way to put together a roster with financial constraints. Team were on more of a level playing field, forcing fans to learn more about the cap and what implications it can have on their club.

img003CapGeek provided a service that really should’ve been provided by the NHL. The league had the resources and time to build a website and share information that fans demanded, but instead allowed a third party to be the source of information. By leveraging various sources and contacts within the NHL, CapGeek forced the information into the public realm. It’s a fantastic example of how individuals can collect and distribute information outside of traditional means using communication technology and strengthen the overall discourse. Not only did CapGeek publish the information, but they also gave their site visitors the ability to create new ideas and knowledge using the content and interactive tools on their website. This was a critical success factor for the website as it further pushed discussion pertaining to trade speculation, roster development and cap implications. It was a fantastic method to cut through the many misleading narratives that fans are inundated with and forced a higher level of  critical thinking when discussing the game.

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Weekly Links: Developing a critical approach to analyzing hockey; Ending the sexist “puck slut” label; Follow up to the World Junior Championship and the NHL Winter Classic; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Zuzana Botiková, who contributes to this blog, produced a radio piece on the Bronze medal winning Slovakia team at the World Junior Championship, which touches on the cultural prominence of hockey in both Slovakia and Canada (and even features an interview with yours truly!). [Radio Slovakia International]
  • Jessica-Lyn Saunders writes about being a female hockey fan and the damaging label of “puck slut” or “puck bunny.” A great read. [Rabid Habs]
  • A bit of an older post, but great stuff from Stefan Wolejszo on how to develop a critical approach to doing hockey analysis. [Integrating Hockey Analysis]
  • Matt Larkin takes an in-depth look at the CWHL as it attempts to grow as a league, including the struggles faced by the unpaid players and a consideration of the WNBA’s relationship to the NBA. [The Hockey News]

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Weekly Links: CWHL All-Star Game reaction; KHL impacted by falling Russian Ruble; NHL’s mumps outbreak; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • If you missed Alvin Ma’s post on the CWHL All-Star Game at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto, you can check it out here. [Hockey in Society]
  • Reina de la Isla and Zoë Hayden have both been doing great reporting on the CWHL this year. Here are their takes on the All-Star Game. [Hockey Wilderness; Stanley Cup of Chowder]
  • The plunging ruble is destabilizing the Russian economy and drastically affecting the Kontinental Hockey League. This is an interesting story worth following in the coming months. Here is some initial analysis from Dmitry Chesnokov and James Mirtle. [Puck Daddy; Globe and Mail]
  • How has the NHL been hit by an outbreak of mumps, a relatively rare disease? Matt McCarthy explores this outbreak, which has affected more than 13 players and two officials, including Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby. [Deadspin]

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Weekly Links: Voynov charged for domestic violence; Confronting racism in hockey; Ex-owner criticizes CHL’s treatment of junior players; Why the CHWL is great; and more

  • After an ongoing police investigation, the LA Kings’ Slava Voynov is being charged for violence against his spouse. [The Score]
  • Really interesting article by Rick Westhead about the treatment of CHL junior players after they leave hockey, as ex-owner Mario Forgione states that “players are a disposable commodity.” [TSN]
  • The new mascot for the WHL’s Prince Albert Raiders, which depicts a cartoonish Arab man, is drawing criticism. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Hockey players from racial or ethnic minorities are increasingly speaking out about the racist abuse that they face in the sport. A really important story to read. [CBC News]
  • Zoë Hayden has a great post on the CWHL’s appeal in contrast to the NHL. [Stanley Cup of Chowder]

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Hockey Research at the 2014 North American Society for the Sociology of Sport (NASSS) Conference

One of the things we like to do at Hockey in Society is highlight current sociocultural research about hockey being done by scholars across the globe (you can see various posts related to academic conferences here). Last week, the annual conference for the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport (NASSS), a scholarly association for sport sociologists, took place in Portland, Oregon. Unfortunately I was not able to attend, but the program is published online, so I am still able to highlight the research being presented that it relevant to the critical study of hockey and its place in society.

After the jump, check out the abstracts from relevant presentations (including from Hockey in Society writers Courtney Szto and Matt Ventresca). Topics include entrepreneurship and the formation of all-Black sport leagues (including the Colored Hockey League in the Canadian Maritimes) in the Reconstruction Era; racialized media media representations of black players, including the Montreal Canadiens’ P.K. Subban; the demise of Hockey Night in Canada and La soirée du hockey and the loss of hockey on Canada’s pubic broadcasters; social media reaction to Punjabi hockey broadcasts; and concussions in sport.

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Weely Links: OHL players suspenced for social media misogyny; Nostalgia and the New York Islanders move to Brooklyn; An interview with Hilary Knight; Toronto Maple Leafs to play in China?; and more

  • Two OHL players, Greg Betzold and Jake Marchment, were suspended for 15 games each after their Tindr conversations with two women, which included a lot of abusive and misogynistic language, were made public. Sunaya Sapurji has a great article on the incident in light of the prevailing cultural attitudes in junior hockey. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Neate Sager’s piece on the incident is also worth reading. [Buzzing the Net]
  • Executives from the Maple Leafs Sports and Entertainment group are exploring business opportunities in China. There’s also interest in China to host an NHL game there as soon as next season. [TSN]
  • An interview with women’s hockey superstar Hilary Knight. [The Pink Puck]
  • A really interesting look at issues of nostalgia and sense of place concerning the Islanders move from the Nassau Coliseum on Long Island to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. [Thought Catalog]
  • Ashley March weighs in on mental illness in hockey, particularly for those countless forgotten players whose careers do not result in well-paid, secure NHL employment. [Canucks Army]

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