Weekly Links: AHL Rule Changes; Decline of the KHL; Push for a CHL Players Union; Birth of the NHL; and more

Source: Tend the Farm

Source: Tend the Farm

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The American Hockey League is implementing rule changes for the 2014-2015 season. Players will now be penalized for playing without a helmet and the overtime format will feature a 3-on-3 component. [Puck Daddy]
  • With two teams contracting and fewer players making the move to Russia, Greg Wyshynski looks at the gradual decline of the KHL and what it could mean for the NHL. [Puck Daddy]
  •  A look into the history of how the NHL was started. An excellent piece. [Greatest Hockey Legends]
  •  Following the Blackhawks signings of Patrick Kane and Jonathan Toews to multi-year contracts, a snapshot of some of the high player salaries in the NHL. [CBC Sports]
  • Nashville Predators forward Rich Clune opened up about his battle with alcoholism. [Rich Clune Show]
  • Ryo Hashimoto of Sapporo, Japan is attending the Columbus Blue Jackets training camp. Hashimoto is a member of the Japanese National Hockey program, and looks to be one of the first players from there to make it to the NHL. [The Score]

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Weekly Links: Stanley Cup Finals odds and ends; Arena discussions in Alberta cities; World Cup of Hockey set to return in 2016; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The Stanley Cup Finals are underway between the New York Rangers and Los Angeles Kings. Chris Johnston report that Los Angeles, not know as a hockey hotbed, appears to be embracing the Kings in a big way. [Sportsnet]
  • Meanwhile, the Rangers have captured the New York sports spotlight – but, asks Evan Sporer, for how long? [SB Nation]
  • The picture for this post is of Rangers fans watching Game 1 in Bryant Park in downtown Manhattan. You can check out the story here. [SB Nation]
  • Mike Spry has a great piece on the media narratives that tend to overtake and be overemphasized in the Stanley Cup Finals. [TSN BarDown]
  • Meanwhile, Arden Zwelling has an interesting behind-the-scenes look at media day during the Finals. [Sportsnet]
  • Finally, for Stanley Cup related news, Greg Wyshynski reports that the first game of the Finals drew large ratings in the US for NBC. [Puck Daddy]

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Hockey Research at the 2014 North American Society for Sport History (NASSH) Conference

I attended the NASSH annual conference last year in Halifax, and was sufficiently inspired by some of the presentations and discussion to write a blog post upon my return. Later this week the 2014 edition of the conference takes place in Colorado Springs, but I will unfortunately not be in attendance. However, the program is available online and there are a handful of hockey presentations amongst the many interesting pieces of research being presented. After the jump, you can read the titles of the presentations (unfortunately abstracts are not posted) and my brief commentary on each topic.

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Weekly Links: P.K. Subban targeted by racist Tweets; Larry Kwong honoured at Hall of Fame; Shifts in body-checking since the 1970s; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Larry Kwong is considered to be the first man of colour to play in the NHL, having suited up for one shift with the New York Rangers in the 1947-48 season. He is being honoured by having a jersey from his days with the Nanaimo Clippers displayed in the Hockey Hall of Fame. [Color of Hockey]
  • Avi Goldberg on notable issues surrounding Twitter during the NHL and NBA playoffs, including  a discussion of reaction to Ron Maclean’s comments about French Canadian referees on Hockey Night in Canada and the dangerous play of the Minnesota Wild’s Matt Cooke. [The Barnstormer]
  • PK Subban of the Montreal Canadiens was the target of racist tweets by Boston Bruins fans following Game 1 of the teams’ series, and his response to them has earned him praise from fans and journalists. [Habs Eyes on the Prize]
  • Nick Cotsonika discusses the cultural significance of the Canadiens in Montreal and the passion of their fans. [Yahoo Sports!]

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Weekly Links: Matt Cooke and dangerous body checking; Pro hockey culture in Denmark; AHL realignment; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The knives are out for Matt Cooke of the Minnesota Wild. Cooke has a history of injurious play and is a highly controversial NHL figure. He has avoided on-ice violent play for some years, but delivered a dangerous knee-on-knee hit to Tyson Barrie of the Colorado Avalanche during a recent playoff game. Eric Duhatschek gives an overview of Cooke’s history and argues that the NHL would be better off without him in the league. [Globe and Mail]
  • Meanwhile, an Ottawa Senators blogger defends Cooke’s actions in light of the broader culture surrounding body-checking in hockey. [Silver Seven]
  • A radical idea to address the behaviour of players like Cooke and the Bruins’ Milan Lucic: a player’s court, in which player representatives from each team would decide the severity of suspensions for dangerous plays. [2 Minutes for Hockey]
  • Patricia Teter has a great interview with former AHL player Kirill Tulupov who recently signed with Frederikshavn White Hawks of the Danish League. Tulupov discusses his experience as a player in Denmark, the local culture and the various fan traditions. [Artful Puck]
  • A gay man’s perspective on attending the NCAA Frozen Four tournament, and his hesitancy (but ultimate ability to safely) identify as gay in a heteronormative hockey fan culture. [Puck Buddys]

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Weekly Links, Bonus Sochi Edition: Should the NHL participate in the Olympics?; The status of women’s hockey at the Games; NCAA hockey alumni at Sochi; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

Editor’s note: Not surprisingly, most of the hockey world is focused on the Winter Olympics currently underway in Sochi, Russia. However, there is still great hockey writing being done about non-Olympics issues. This edition of the Weekly Links is thus divided into two posts: on Friday we posted non-Olympics links, while this post is devoted exclusively to writing about the Sochi Games. We hope you enjoy both posts!

  • There has been a great deal of discussion about whether NHL players should continue to participate in the Olympic Games. Ed Snider, owner of the Philadelphia Flyers, offered outspoken comments about the NHL’s participation in the Olympics, calling it “ridiculous.” [Broad Street Hockey]
  • Nick Cotsonika offers a good take on the dilemma posed to the NHL by Olympics participation, particularly given the popularity of the event with players like Zdeno Chara, who missed two Boston Bruins’ games to carry the Slovakian flag at the Opening Ceremonies. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • And Harrison Mooney also discusses whether the NHL should send players to the Games, arguing that the current situation “create[s] a situation where players have to serve two masters” – their club and their country. [Puck Daddy]

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Weekly Links: Lots of Winter Classic reaction; USA Hockey/Bobby Ryan controversy; Rogers deal with NHL hurts poorest fans; East Indians’ increasing prominence in hockey; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The big hockey news of the past two weeks concerned the NHL’s annual Winter Classic, which took place between the Detroit Red Wings and Toronto Maple Leafs on New Year’s Day at Michigan Stadium. The game set an attendance record for hockey, with 105,491 fans attending the game. [The Province]
  • It also recorded bumper ratings for CBC and NBC. NBC had 4.4 million viewers for its broadcast, while CBC drew 3.6 million. [SB Nation; Globe and Mail]
  • Lots of writers had rave reviews of the event, which certainly did not lack in its picturesqueness. Here are links to some of the better reactions from mainstream media, by Katie Baker, Adam Proteau, and Chris Johnston respectively. [Grantland; The Hockey News; Sportsnet]
  • And here are reactions from some Red Wings bloggers… [Winging it in Motown; The Malik Report]
  • … and some Maple Leafs bloggers. [Pension Plan Puppets; Leafs Nation]

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Weekly Links: MLSE service workers strike, settle; Teenage boys must choose between CHL and NCAA; USA Hockey to ban fighting?

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, the multibillion dollar corporation that owns the Toronto Maple Leafs, settled with its striking concession and service workers this week. Final details have not yet been released, but the MLSE proposals included wage rollbacks or freezes for many employees. [Rank and File; Toronto Star]
  • Big news in junior hockey, as USA Hockey is looking into banning fighting at all levels of its amateur system, including the junior league the USHL. [SB Nation]
  • Amalie Benjamin of the Boston Globe has an inside look at the NHL’s Department of Player Safety, which is headed by Brendan Shanahan and responsible for fining and suspending players for dangerous play. [Boston Globe]

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Weekly Links: Reaction to Shawn Thornton’s attack on Brooks Orpik; Big news in Canadian women’s hockey; Academic conferences on hockey research; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • The attack by the Boston Bruins’ Shawn Thornton on the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Brooks Orpik, which Courtney Szto discussed on this blog last weekend, has dominated the hockey headlines this week. Nicholas Cotsonika weighed in harshly against the act and the culture of violence in which it occurred. [Yahoo! Sports]
  • Jonathan Willis discussed the incident and argued that the “grey area” around self-policing in hockey places players in untenable situations: “As long as the NHL persists in its tight-rope walk between policing the game and allowing the players to dispense . . . “frontier justice” it’s only going to be a matter of time until something like this happens again.” [Cult of Hockey]
  • Jay Rosehill of the Philadelphia Flyers came to Thornton’s defense in this lengthy interview. If you want an insight into the culture of hockey fighting and the “Code” then give this a listed. [Sportsnet]

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Weekly Links: Successful Toronto youth program for disadvantaged and minority boys; the business of the NHL; Stu Grimson, Jim Thomson weigh in on fighting; and more

Welcome to Hockey in Society’s Weekly Links post. This feature highlights articles or blog entries that are related to Hockey in Society’s areas of interest and that may be of interest to the site’s readers. Please check out some of the great writing that is happening in the hockey media and blogosphere!

  • A really interesting read from William Douglas about the Skillz Black Aces and the Black Mafia, two Toronto teams for male youth of colour that were “created to give minority and disadvantaged Canadian youth the exposure and the opportunity to play the expensive sport of hockey.” The teams have featured NHLers such as Kevin Weekes, Anson Carter, Joel Ward, Chris Stewart, and Wayne Simmonds. [Color of Hockey]
  • Eric Duhatschek conducted an in-depth interview with NHL Commissioner, Gary Bettman, that explored topics such as potential expansion, league revenues, Canadian TV contracts, and more. [Globe and Mail]
  • Meanwhile, Greg Wyshynski interviewed the NHL’s John Collins about the NHL Stadium Series and various media ventures, including its newly announced “NHL Revealed.” [Puck Daddy]

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