Links Round-up: R.I.P. Larry Kwong; Canucks host South Asian heritage celebration; CWHL/NWHL merger on the horizon?; and more

Formerly known as “Weekly Links,” our round-up of important and interesting pieces from the hockey blogosphere and media will now appear twice a month.

  • R.I.P. Larry Kwong, the NHL player of colour. Kwong, who was Chinese-Canadian, played briefly for the New York Rangers in 1948 and enjoyed a successful career in the Quebec Senior Hockey League. [CBC News; Washington Post]
  • Congratulations to the 2018 CWHL Clarkson Cup and NWHL Isobel Cup champions, the Markham Thunder and Metropolitan Riveters respectively. [The Ice Garden; Victory Press]
  • With pressure for a potential CHWL/NWHL merger heating up, Zoë Hayden has an excellent, in-depth critique of the reasons that the NHL should not be involved in creating a single women’s league: “The idea that the NHL should be involved or mediate this merger is preposterous and absurd.” [Victory Press]
  • A photo of a breastfeeding mother in a hockey changeroom has gone viral, and gained mother Sarah Small widespread praise for her public breastfeeding. [Huffington Post]

  • A profile of Norway’s Lena Schroeder, the only woman competitor in the 2018 Para-Ice Hockey competition at PyeongChang 2018. [BBC News]
  • Two former players on the WHL’s Everett Silvertips, and the mother of another former WHL player, testified about receiving faulty medical advice, being offered subpar educational opportunities, and suffering emotional abuse. The WHL has hired former RCMP officer to investigate these explosive claims. [TSN]
  • The Vancouver Canucks hosted a South Asian Heritage evening at their game yesterday, featuring artistic and cultural performances, as well as appearances by players of South Asian descent. [Vancouver Canucks]

  • Rick Westhead updates the concussion lawsuit by former players against the NHL. With a nod to the NFL’s insistence that football does not cause long-term brain damage, the players’ lawyer described the NHL as the “new league of denial.” [TSN]
  • Medical researchers are calling for stricter return-to-play protocols for concussions in youth hockey. Will the Canadian youth hockey system listen? [CBC Sports]
  • Former NHL goalie Clint Malarchuk may be best known for a gruesome skate cut to his neck he suffered on-ice in 1989. In this piece, he reflects powerfully on the incident and the downward spiral that his life took into substance abuse and mental illness. [The Player’s Tribune]
  • Former NHLer Andrew Ference is well-known for his LGBTQ and environmental activism. Ference tells Greg Wyshynski that, in order to attract and represent diverse fanbases, the NHL must focus beyond the interests of “middle-aged white dudes”. [ESPN]
  • William Douglas profiles the athletes of colour competing to reach the NCAA’s Frozen Four tournament. [Color of Hockey]
  • The NHL has released its 2018 Sustainability Report. [NHL.com]
  • Team Tunisia is fundraising to attend the 2018 Arab Cup:

  • As Ryan Kennedy explains, NHL rookies face a steep learning curve off the ice as they learn to navigate adult responsibilities and the demands of a professional athletic career. [The Hockey News]
  • Kevin McGran provides a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the production of a Saturday Hockey Night in Canada broadcast. [The Star]
  • In 2008, Burnaby 8 Rinks in Burnaby, BC, installed defibrillators, after a rec player died on ice. These devices have since been used to save the lives the lives of two players who collapsed during games. [Burnaby Now]
  • The City of Edmonton will be demolishing the Northlands Coliseum, former home of the Oilers, now that the team plays at the new Rogers Place. [CBC Edmonton]
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